0 comments on “Australian Digital Inclusion Index (ADII) 2018”

Australian Digital Inclusion Index (ADII) 2018

downloadThe Australian Digital Inclusion Index, powered by Roy Morgan Research, measures the extent of digital inclusion in Australia. Access and affordability can present barriers to digital inclusion, however an individual’s digital engagement is also largely affected by Digital Ability (attitudes, skills and activities), whether a person can see potential benefits of engagement, and motivation and attitude, including concerns about safety and security.

This is a digital inclusion measurement tool (Index) that will help inform and promote public policy and program responses to enhance digital inclusion in Australia.

The key objectives of this initiative are:

  • To improve our understanding of digital inclusion and its relationship to social and economic disadvantage in Australia
  • To raise awareness and focus attention on the social impact of digital inclusion
  • To facilitate consultation, debate and discussion among key cross sectoral digital inclusion stakeholders
  • To inform what business, government and community organisations can do to enhance digital confidence and participation for all Australians.

The Australian Digital Inclusion Index  is not tailored to a particular group or section of the community. It measures the level of digital inclusion of the Australian population as a whole and tracks this over time. Any community in Australia can replicate the index to compare their results against Australia as a whole and if they are able, to do this over time.

source: https://digitalinclusionindex.org.au/ 

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0 comments on “Benin is the latest African nation taxing the internet”

Benin is the latest African nation taxing the internet

taxationBenin has joined a growing list of African states imposing levies for using the internet.

The government passed a decree in late August taxing its citizens for accessing the internet and social-media apps. The directive, first proposed in July, institutes a fee (link in French) of 5 CFA francs ($0.008) per megabyte consumed through services like Facebook, WhatsApp, and Twitter. It also introduces a 5% fee, on top of taxes, on texting and calls, according to advocacy group Internet Sans Frontières (ISF).

The new law has been denounced, with citizens and advocates using the hashtag #Taxepamesmo (“Don’t tax my megabytes”) to call on officials to cancel the levy. The increased fees will not only burden the poorest consumers and widen the digital divide, but they will also be “disastrous” for the nation’s nascent digital economy, says ISF’s executive director Julie Owono. A petition against the levy on Change.org has garnered nearly 7,000 signatures since it was created five days ago.

The West African nation joins an increasing number of African countries that have introduced new fees for accessing digital spaces. Last month, Zambia approved a tax on internet calls in order to protect large telcos at the expense of already squeezed citizens. In July, Uganda also introduced a tax for accessing 60 websites and social-media apps, including WhatsApp and Twitter, from mobile phones. Officials in Kampala also increased excise duty fees on mobile-money transactions from 10% to 15%, in a bid to reduce capital flight and improve the country’s tax-to-GDP ratio.

Digital-rights advocates say these measures are part of wider moves to silence critics and the vibrant socio-political, cultural, and economic conversations taking place online. The adoptions of these taxes, they say, could have a costly impact not just on democracy and social cohesion, but on economic growth, innovation, and net neutrality. Paradigm Initiative, a Nigerian company that works to advance digital rights, has said it was worried Nigeria would follow Uganda’s and Zambia’s footsteps and start levying over-the-top media services like Facebook and Telegram that deliver content on the internet.

But taxing the digital sector might have a negative impact in the long run. Research has already shown that Uganda’s ad hoc fees could cost its economy $750 million in revenue this year alone. “These governments are killing the goose that lays the golden egg,” Owono said.

source: www.qz.com

0 comments on “$1 Trillion Boost to Asean GDP From Digital Economy”

$1 Trillion Boost to Asean GDP From Digital Economy

The digital revolution that has become such a powerful force for global change is still in early days in the ASEAN member states. ASEAN’s digital economy represents only 7% of its GDP, compared with 16% in China and 35% in the US, Bain said in a report on Monday. However, the region has much to gain by laying the foundation for the digital economy to power and accelerate intraregional trade and growth (what we term “digital integration”). Digital integration will be critical for ASEAN businesses to compete at home and overseas—it has the power to turn small and midsize enterprises (SMEs) into regional and global players. Digital integration could deliver a $1 trillion rise in GDP in ASEAN by 2025.

Getting there will take a significant effort. While enhancements have been made across ASEAN, broadband coverage needs to improve in rural areas, and advanced digital tools need to become more affordable for SMEs, among other challenges. Also, to help individuals and businesses across the region benefit from digital opportunities, member states will need to accelerate and coordinate their initiatives. The results can be dramatic: ASEAN businesses would have the opportunity to leapfrog those in other major economies.

bain infographic

content nain

source: www.bain.com

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0 comments on “Telkom SA calls for digital economy summit (South Africa)”

Telkom SA calls for digital economy summit (South Africa)

-fs-Sipho-Maseko-1-2018.xlTelkom South Africa has called for a multi-sectoral digital economy summit to be convened and attended by operators, the industry regulator, vertical market representatives, tertiary education institutions and other telecommunications industry stakeholders.

In his keynote address to delegates at the 2018 Southern Africa Telecommunication Networks and Applications Conference (SATNAC), Group CEO Telkom SA Sipho Maseko said this would provide a forum to address the question of how to generate economic growth.

The question of how relevant stakeholders will contribute had to be asked and answered.

These questions are not only for operators said Maseko, and it is envisaged that the platform would serve as a forum for all stakeholders to state their position.

Maseko identified several drivers of economy including investment in infrastructure to deliver ubiquitous connectivity, skills and subject matter experts across the spectrum, fair competition and regulation.

In addition to the role of data within an ever-changing market and the influence of the digitised consumer, Maseko also touched upon the issue of regulation.

Telkom SA remains embroiled in a dispute with ICASA (Independent Communications Authority of SA) regarding plans to reduce call termination rates – the price mobile and fixed network operators charge each other for terminating calls between networks.

According to a recent ITWeb report, the company has affirmed that unless the regulator’s draft call termination rates are not amended, it may have to change its business model, stop operations in rural areas and possibly have to cut jobs.

It has reportedly issued a counter-proposal to ICASA and stated that under the regulator’s proposed changes, it would “continue to effectively subsidise the larger mobile network operators.”

Government’s intention and objectives behind the wireless open access network proposed in the draft Electronic Communications Amendment Bill has also attracted widespread attention within the local telecommunications space.

“Regulation and policy can be a big enabler for data growth… but regulation must keep up with the market and tech advances. Regulators sometimes almost exclude themselves from the debate. The question is how do we get the economy to recover?” said Maseko.

He also cautioned that call termination rates and proposals have not recognised the fact that the market has converged, and regulation has to enable investment.

source: www.itwebafrica.com

0 comments on “New Vision for A Global Digital Economy Emerges At Smart China Expo (event)”

New Vision for A Global Digital Economy Emerges At Smart China Expo (event)

smart china expoIndustry leaders attending the first Smart China Expo (SCE 2018) in China’s western city of Chongqing have articulated a new vision for how the world’s digital economy will evolve at the event’s Global Digital Economy Summit, a forum that brought together 650 participants under the theme “New Digital Economy, New Growth Engine.” Speakers projected a future in which Big Data reshapes the way businesses and governments operate, cooperate, and compete.

New forces being unleashed by current innovations threaten to disrupt the existing economic growth models of many industries, as digital information will rise to the same status as land and capital as a key element of productivity. Meanwhile, governments around the world are building “smart infrastructure” as they seek to use technology to upgrade power grids, railways, ports and toll roads, and seek to integrate everything. Big Data technology also helps build “smart cities,” boost consumption, and improve social welfare programs ranging from education to philanthropy to healthcare.

“Artificial Intelligence (AI) could be a big contributor to healthcare,” said Piero Scaruffi, a cognitive scientist, AI expert and writer of A History of Silicon Valley. Piero, believes that technology will make a better society and that AI will slash the cost of healthcare. “When we talk about machines saving lives, that’s real progress,” he said.

Kate Garman, smart city policy adviser to the Mayor of Seattle, shared insights into smart city management at SCE 2018. “Smart cities have challenged cities to be innovative. It has been the inspiration for cities to jump forward using technology,” she said.

Despite huge progress, China still faces many hurdles in developing a digital economy, said Li Yizhong, former head of China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT). “Chinese manufacturers lag in the application of smart manufacturing, and businesses need to accelerate their digitalization process.” Li pointed out that “issues like how to balance improving efficiency and protecting jobs, and how to protect commercial secretes in the age of Internet also remain challenging.”

Alibaba Vice President Liu Song predicted that over the next 10 years, AI and the Internet of Thongs (IoT) will replace mobile technologies as the world’s defining digital technologies, which is why Alibaba is heavily investing in three areas: Big Data, network synergy and smart data. Liu’s view was echoed by Cai Yongzhong, Chairman of Deloitte China, who urged traditional businesses to actively embrace innovation in the face of the upcoming digital revolution.

For more information, please visit http://www.ichongqing.info/smart-china-expo/.

About Smart China Expo (SCE)

Held Chongqing, the Smart China Expo (SCE) is a world-class, national-level Expo that supports the development of Big Data and smart technologies in Western China. High-profiled guests joined the event including 4 political heavyweights, 22 national government officials that above ministerial-level, 58 persons who are in charge of institutions under national departments, and 407 senior representatives from top tier global brands such as Siemens, IBM, Microsoft, Qualcomm, Baidu, Alibaba, Tencent, Huawei and more.

source: www.multivu.com