0 comments on “The rise of Digital Challengers (CEE) – McKinsey research”

The rise of Digital Challengers (CEE) – McKinsey research

For the countries of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), the potential economic benefits of digitization are great: up to €200 billion in additional GDP by 2025. This economic boost would lead to greater global competitiveness and prosperity for the region’s 100 million people. While the digital transition also harbors potential risks in the form of shifts in society, public and private-sector leaders can take effective actions to mitigate them whilst pursuing the digital opportunity.

source: https://digitalchallengers.mckinsey.com

0 comments on “New skills now – Inclusion in the digital economy (report)”

New skills now – Inclusion in the digital economy (report)

Increased global connectivity, exponential advances in processing power, the flow and accumulation of data, and rapidly dropping price points are fueling technological innovation at a speed and scale we have not seen before. In the past, economies have benefited from technology change. But these shifts occurred over decades. Today, the cumulative effect of technology is accelerating progress exponentially. Internet penetration, mobile phones and data availability have skyrocketed, facilitated by the rapidly dropping cost of hardware.

source and more: Accenture report

0 comments on “Schools should teach the curriculum of the future, not the past”

Schools should teach the curriculum of the future, not the past

Robots, artificial intelligence, automation – no longer the stuff of science fiction movies. Overwhelming evidence shows the shift in what the workforce needs is already underway and that it will continue to grow much larger in the future. All around the world, leaders from government and industry debate the future of work and the changes brought by technology and automation. Despite this, the world is not reacting fast enough to update our system of education.

According to analysis of 750 occupations by the McKinsey Global Institute, 51% of job activities are highly susceptible to automation – and that’s through adapting currently demonstrated technology alone. It’s also important to note that these activities span jobs across industries as well as skill and wage levels. This indicates that automation is much less likely to lead to the mass unemployment predicted by alarmists but is almost certainly going to necessitate the redefinition of most occupations and requisite skills.

To prepare all students with the creative, collaborative and digital problem-solving skills of the future, schools must teach computer science as part of the core curriculum. Computer science is not just about coding. It is also about computational thinking, interface design, data analysis, machine learning, cybersecurity, networking and robotics. Learning computer science encourages creativity, problem-solving, ethics and collaboration – skills which aren’t just important for technical careers in the developed world, but valuable for every career in all economies. What’s more, in a study of how students felt about their classes, computer science and engineering trailed only the arts in terms of classes they liked the most.

 Change the Equation and C+R Research

Education leaders should discuss removing aspects of the curriculum of 1918 to make room for the curriculum of 2018. Computer science shouldn’t be relegated to after-school clubs, robotics contests or hackathons. It shouldn’t be accessible only at a premium but taught as part of the primary and secondary school day, accessible to all students.

source and more www.weforum.org

0 comments on “Seminar talks future of Vietnamese digital economy”

Seminar talks future of Vietnamese digital economy

Hanoi (VNA) – A scientific seminar to offer strategic forecasts about the future of the Vietnamese digital economy took place in Hanoi on December 14. 

The event was co-organised by the Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences (VASS) and the Australia-based Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation’s Data 61 project. 

Speaking at the event, expert Nguyen Thu Nga from the VASS said the Vietnamese government has tapped into the potential of digital economy by issuing a master plan on the development of e-commerce and a national high technology development programme. 

The number of Internet subscribers soared 320-fold to 64 million in January 2018 from nearly 200,000 in 2000. 

Australian digital economy expert Jessica Antherton said digital economy is one of the pillars of economic growth as countries worldwide are embarking on the fourth industrial revolution. 

She pointed out seven key trends impacting the Vietnamese digital economy till 2040, including emerging digital technology that will improve production, further focus on cyber and private security, energy and infrastructure in service of digital network, smart city development, increase in the middle-income class in Asia, wider gap in income, and increase in the use of high-value products and services. 

There remains room to develop digital economy in the next two decades, but it should be directed cautiously, she said. 

Participants at the event discussed trends and risks affecting the Vietnamese digital economy and what Vietnam could do to avoid economic failures or crises in each scenario.

0 comments on “First Arab Digital Economy conference kicks off in Abu Dhabi”

First Arab Digital Economy conference kicks off in Abu Dhabi

ABU DHABI – 16 December 2018: The first Arab Digital Economy Conference kicked off in Abu Dhabi on Sunday under the aegis of Sheikh Mohamed bin Ziyad al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme commander of the UAE’s armed forces. 

Chairman of the Arab Federation for the Digital Economy and an adviser to the Council of Arab Economic Unity (CAEU) Ali el Khoury voiced hope that the two-day conference would be a turning point in developing the digital economy. 

Governor of the Central Bank of Egypt Tarek Amer and former telecommunications minister Atef Helmi attended the first session. 

The conference will for the first time present an initiative for a common Arab digital economy strategy under the theme of “A Common Vision For an Arab Digital Economy Initiative.” 

The council had chosen Abu Dhabi to kick off the conference in its first ever edition because the leaders of the UAE presented their expertise and achievements in supporting a common Arab vision for a digital economy. 

The conference will showcase different parts of the strategy, as well the economic opportunities in Arab countries that have resulted from the digital transformation.

source: www.egypttoday.com

0 comments on “Cybersecurity as key for a Digital Economy and Society – ICT 2018 (Vienna – 4-6 December 2018)”

Cybersecurity as key for a Digital Economy and Society – ICT 2018 (Vienna – 4-6 December 2018)

Hall A, Level 2, 05/12/2018 (09:3011:00)

The session focus on strategic areas where the EU needs to invest in order to reinforce its cybersecurity, and thus protect its economy and society: research, innovation, and industrial capabilities. The debate highlight examples of cybersecurity impact in different domains/application areas.

Europe needs to develop further essential capacities to secure its digital economy, society and democracy. The session aims to stimulate the debate on how to achieve this goal. The session also make the case for the Commission’s initiatives in the area of cybersecurity research and innovation, raising awareness on various challenges in economy and society.

Speakers

Alexandra MANIATI (European Banking Federation, Belgium), SpeakerAnand PRASAD (NEC Corporation, Japan), SpeakerKai RANNENBERG (Chair of Mobile Business & Multilateral Security at Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany), SpeakerJesper RASMUSSEN (EASA, Flight Standards, Germany), SpeakerKhalil ROUHANA (European Commission, DG Communications Networks, Content & Technology, Belgium), SpeakerKatrina SICHEL (Wit and Word Communications sprl, Belgium), ModeratorOndrej VLCEK (Avast, Czech Republic), SpeakerStephanie WEHNER (Delft University of Technology, QuTech, Netherlands), Speaker

source: www.ec.europa.eu