0 comments on “Telkom SA calls for digital economy summit (South Africa)”

Telkom SA calls for digital economy summit (South Africa)

-fs-Sipho-Maseko-1-2018.xlTelkom South Africa has called for a multi-sectoral digital economy summit to be convened and attended by operators, the industry regulator, vertical market representatives, tertiary education institutions and other telecommunications industry stakeholders.

In his keynote address to delegates at the 2018 Southern Africa Telecommunication Networks and Applications Conference (SATNAC), Group CEO Telkom SA Sipho Maseko said this would provide a forum to address the question of how to generate economic growth.

The question of how relevant stakeholders will contribute had to be asked and answered.

These questions are not only for operators said Maseko, and it is envisaged that the platform would serve as a forum for all stakeholders to state their position.

Maseko identified several drivers of economy including investment in infrastructure to deliver ubiquitous connectivity, skills and subject matter experts across the spectrum, fair competition and regulation.

In addition to the role of data within an ever-changing market and the influence of the digitised consumer, Maseko also touched upon the issue of regulation.

Telkom SA remains embroiled in a dispute with ICASA (Independent Communications Authority of SA) regarding plans to reduce call termination rates – the price mobile and fixed network operators charge each other for terminating calls between networks.

According to a recent ITWeb report, the company has affirmed that unless the regulator’s draft call termination rates are not amended, it may have to change its business model, stop operations in rural areas and possibly have to cut jobs.

It has reportedly issued a counter-proposal to ICASA and stated that under the regulator’s proposed changes, it would “continue to effectively subsidise the larger mobile network operators.”

Government’s intention and objectives behind the wireless open access network proposed in the draft Electronic Communications Amendment Bill has also attracted widespread attention within the local telecommunications space.

“Regulation and policy can be a big enabler for data growth… but regulation must keep up with the market and tech advances. Regulators sometimes almost exclude themselves from the debate. The question is how do we get the economy to recover?” said Maseko.

He also cautioned that call termination rates and proposals have not recognised the fact that the market has converged, and regulation has to enable investment.

source: www.itwebafrica.com

0 comments on “New Vision for A Global Digital Economy Emerges At Smart China Expo (event)”

New Vision for A Global Digital Economy Emerges At Smart China Expo (event)

smart china expoIndustry leaders attending the first Smart China Expo (SCE 2018) in China’s western city of Chongqing have articulated a new vision for how the world’s digital economy will evolve at the event’s Global Digital Economy Summit, a forum that brought together 650 participants under the theme “New Digital Economy, New Growth Engine.” Speakers projected a future in which Big Data reshapes the way businesses and governments operate, cooperate, and compete.

New forces being unleashed by current innovations threaten to disrupt the existing economic growth models of many industries, as digital information will rise to the same status as land and capital as a key element of productivity. Meanwhile, governments around the world are building “smart infrastructure” as they seek to use technology to upgrade power grids, railways, ports and toll roads, and seek to integrate everything. Big Data technology also helps build “smart cities,” boost consumption, and improve social welfare programs ranging from education to philanthropy to healthcare.

“Artificial Intelligence (AI) could be a big contributor to healthcare,” said Piero Scaruffi, a cognitive scientist, AI expert and writer of A History of Silicon Valley. Piero, believes that technology will make a better society and that AI will slash the cost of healthcare. “When we talk about machines saving lives, that’s real progress,” he said.

Kate Garman, smart city policy adviser to the Mayor of Seattle, shared insights into smart city management at SCE 2018. “Smart cities have challenged cities to be innovative. It has been the inspiration for cities to jump forward using technology,” she said.

Despite huge progress, China still faces many hurdles in developing a digital economy, said Li Yizhong, former head of China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT). “Chinese manufacturers lag in the application of smart manufacturing, and businesses need to accelerate their digitalization process.” Li pointed out that “issues like how to balance improving efficiency and protecting jobs, and how to protect commercial secretes in the age of Internet also remain challenging.”

Alibaba Vice President Liu Song predicted that over the next 10 years, AI and the Internet of Thongs (IoT) will replace mobile technologies as the world’s defining digital technologies, which is why Alibaba is heavily investing in three areas: Big Data, network synergy and smart data. Liu’s view was echoed by Cai Yongzhong, Chairman of Deloitte China, who urged traditional businesses to actively embrace innovation in the face of the upcoming digital revolution.

For more information, please visit http://www.ichongqing.info/smart-china-expo/.

About Smart China Expo (SCE)

Held Chongqing, the Smart China Expo (SCE) is a world-class, national-level Expo that supports the development of Big Data and smart technologies in Western China. High-profiled guests joined the event including 4 political heavyweights, 22 national government officials that above ministerial-level, 58 persons who are in charge of institutions under national departments, and 407 senior representatives from top tier global brands such as Siemens, IBM, Microsoft, Qualcomm, Baidu, Alibaba, Tencent, Huawei and more.

source: www.multivu.com

0 comments on “Surviving in a digital economy: A study of the consultant brokerage industry”

Surviving in a digital economy: A study of the consultant brokerage industry

The master thesis is written by Andreas Pettersson and concludes the author’s studies
in Industrial and Management Engineering with a focus on innovation and strategic
business development, Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.

Purpose – The purpose of this master thesis is to identify critical factors and create guidelines for traditional consultant brokerage firms to stay competitive in a digital economy.

Methodology – This qualitative study with an abductive approach, gathered data primary from semi-structured interviews. A total 18 interviews were conducted with travel agency executives as well as buyers, sellers, and matchmakers of consultant services. Collected data were analyzed using thematic coding.

Findings – The main findings of this show that traditional matchmakers can take actions to stay competitive if a digital platform enters the market. In addition, the study suggests proactive and reactive measures that organizations can take to address these disruptive forces.

Theoretical implications – The study will provide an understanding of consultant brokerage and their function as a matchmaker in the marketplace. Besides, it will provide an insight into how some traditional matchmakers can survive in a digital economy.

Practical implications – This thesis will provide managers with concrete guidelines on how to react in the event of disintermediation of a matchmaker market.

Keywords – Disintermediation, Business strategy, Reintermediation, Matchmakers, Intermediates, Consultants, Brokers

Paper type – Master thesis

More/source:http://ltu.diva-portal.org

0 comments on “Irish education system needs ‘profound changes’ to secure digital future”

Irish education system needs ‘profound changes’ to secure digital future

The managing director of Accenture Ireland has warned that Ireland needs to make “profound” changes to its education system to ensure the country is equipped to secure the next wave of jobs in the digital economy.

Alastair Blair, who is also chair of Ibec’s digital economy policy committee, says the advent of artificial intelligence, virtual reality and augmented reality may require a move to a more modular education system to ensure the future workforce has the necessary depth and breadth of skills.

“Traditionally, Ireland has had access to deep skills and the availability of a young and educated workforce,” said Blair, who believes the protection of digital jobs requires a long-term commitment from government, academia and industry working together.

“There is a real opportunity for Ireland to position itself well. However, there is a need for a profound change to our education system to take advantage of the next wave of jobs,” he said.

Blair said Accenture, which acquired Irish creative agency Rothco for a reported €20m this year, is targeting further acquisitions as it is set to mark 50 years in Ireland.

source: www.independent.ie

0 comments on “An organisation in Iraq is working with young people to help “bring the country to a more digital economy””

An organisation in Iraq is working with young people to help “bring the country to a more digital economy”

Re:Coded was founded in 2016 and holds courses for people wishing to learn more about coding.

Zahra Shah, Program Manager at the organisation said: “We launched as a coding school to try and upscale youth here and bring them more towards a digital economy especially in Iraq where a lot of the jobs are provided by the government.

“The economy is not doing great, a lot of the money that comes from oil and gas, they’re not using it to rebuild the country and a lot of that is due to corruption unfortunately. But our solution is that there are so many youth here interested in technology.

Zahra Shah, Program Manager at Iraq Re:Coded said there is a need for coding teachers in the country (Re:Coded)

“So we started a school to cater to that need for youths to have access to that education. Even the students that learn computer science at university, they’re not learning properly how to become computer programmers, it’s very theoretical. We fill that gap by teaching android app development.”

Students can take part in Re:Coded’s five month boot camps or the tech entrepreneurship academy. It’s come at a good time for the country, with the start up and tech industry growing.

Ms Shah has seen the growth first hand having moved to Iraq last August. She said: “I’ve seen so much change already. There is a huge co-working space that opened in Baghdad four months ago in addition to our co-working space in Erbil. I feel that there’s more NGOs as well getting with the programme when it comes to technology.

“A lot of our graduates are being employed because they have the tech skills to leverage that and move their projects forward so I am definitely seeing a difference. People are starting to see the benefit of relying more on technology and doing stuff online, freelancing and entrepreneurship.”

Iraq’s tech scene is growing rapidly and Re:Coded is hoping to get as many women onto the scene as possible (REUTERS)

“Iraq is still behind the rest of the middle east in comparison to Dubai, but even just on a grass-roots level I feel it’s growing so quick and i’m really surprised to see how much it’s changed just from being here in a year so in another five years, I see it going a lot further.” A main focus by the organisation is the need to get women involved in coding.

“We always aim for at least 40 percent women across our projects, in our boot camps, we have 40-50 percent, the same with everything we offer. A minimum of 40 percent is our goal,” Ms Shah added.

For those who graduate from the boot camp, the job prospects are huge. Some have found employment with some of the organisation’s sponsors while others have decided to start their own startup. While others have chosen to teach coding themselves.

The country’s tech and startup industry is starting to grow (Re:Coded)

“In our last boot camp, we had 35 students, of those students that were looking for full-time employment, around 90 percent of them have gone into employment especially in the local economy.

0 comments on “Nigeria – the Federal Government to achieve growth with digital economy”

Nigeria – the Federal Government to achieve growth with digital economy

NigeriaNigeria.

The Federal Government has announced plans to achieve an all-inclusive economy by prioritising developmental efforts in the digital economy.

Minister of Communication Adebayo Shittu said in Lagos at the weekend that the move by the Federal Government was to ensure that Nigerians had equal access to government services by using digitalisation.

He said plans were on to establish a Nigeria Postal Services (NIPOST) banking, real estate and insurance company to get Nigerians into a financial inclusive economy.

Shittu, who spoke at a stakeholders’ conference on digital addressing system and address verification system, organised by NIPOST, said: ”We are looking at establishing a NIPOST property and development company to make use of NIPOST underutilised facilities wasting away. It is our plan as part of the general reform to ensure that most of the vacant and unused land are leased out to the public to establish property development. Some of the land will be available to build estates, event centres, garages and others to earn revenue for the Federal Government.”

He said in two years, NIPOST would be the leading Federal Government agency in terms of its influence on the life of every Nigerian, adding that courtesy of its upgraded processes, it would help in bringing in the largest amount of money into the Federal Government’s coffers.

”There are communities, which are about 200 to 300 kilometres away from the state capital. With the help of these offices, people can access government services from their communities. By the time we conclude in establishing these companies, there will be no one who will not be affected positively by NIPOST multifaceted companies,” the minister said.

source: http://thenationonlineng.net

0 comments on “Regulating a Digital Economy: An Indian Perspective”

Regulating a Digital Economy: An Indian Perspective

The “fourth industrial revolution” which has been characterised by end-to-end digitalisation has led to unprecedented increases in connectivity and data flows. By 2017, Asia had the largest number of internet users in the world, with 1.9 billion people online.

Joshua Meltzer, Senior Fellow, Global Economy and Development at the Brookings Institution, spoke about regulating the digital economy at a Brookings India Development Seminar on April 20, 2018.

In 2014 cross-border data flows were 45 times larger than in 2005, raising global gross domestic product (GDP) by approximately 3.5 per cent, equivalent to $2.8 trillion dollars in 2014. According to the World Bank, it is expected that a 10 per cent increase in internet penetration in the exporting country would lead to a 1.9 per cent increase in exports. In fact, in the U.S. alone internet and data use increased GDP by 3.4-4.8 per cent, as per estimates of the United States International Trade Commission.

In India, the digital economy is expected to contribute $550bn-$1tr in GDP by 2025, and add 1.5-2 million jobs by 2018 through its Digital India initiative.

The economic opportunities from technologies such as cloud computing, big data and the internet of things are also not limited to the IT sector but are economy-wide, including in sectors such as manufacturing and agriculture, Meltzer argued based on his working paper “Regulating for a digital economy: Understanding the importance of cross-border data flows in Asia”.

Over 40 per cent of India’s goods and services exports consist of software services and IT-enabled services (ITES) from financial analysis, accounting, medical transcription to the provision of applications for smartphones. Cross-border data flows remain vital for India’s exports of services.

Governments, however, are increasingly introducing measures that restrict data flows.

In order to build the digital economy, India will need to determine a fit-for-purpose regulation especially in privacy, consumer protection, intellectual property and financial regulation.

Cross-border data flow restrictions can take one of several forms, from restrictions on data being transferred outside national borders and requiring prior consent for global transfers. According to a study by Bauer et al, the cost of proposed and enacted data localisation measures in India would reduce its GDP by 0.1 per cent.

Meltzer argued that restrictions on cross-border data flows harm both the competitiveness of the country implementing the policies and other countries that rely on that data from those countries.

In India, a few examples of government regulations and rules include the Information Technology Rules (2011) that limits cross-border transfer of sensitive personal data. The National Data Sharing and Accessibility Policy (2012) which requires government data be stored in India, particularly for cloud providers. The Companies (Accounts) Rules (2014) which requires backups of financial information, if stored overseas, to be stored in India. The National Telecom M2M roadmap (2015) which requires gateways and app servers that serve Indian customers to be located in India.

Data flow restrictions are enacted with several goals in mind – from protecting citizens’ personal privacy, to ensuring national security and protecting local businesses. The capacity to move large quantities of data seamlessly and rapidly across borders can undermine domestic regulatory standards in areas such as privacy and consumer protection.

Meltzer argued that such data restrictions limit access to digital commerce networks and online resources and the ability of businesses to synthesise large data sets, on a wider scale they affect business models, reduce productivity, innovation as well as business competitiveness by forcing businesses to invest in lower quality data facilities.

So, while this wave of digitisation has massive economy wide positive impacts, data localisation could have massive economic costs, he added.

Meltzer recommended that the realisation of legitimate regulatory goals such as privacy and security must happen alongside maximising the economic and trade opportunities cross-border data flows offer. The focus for regulators needs to be using existing technologies to harness economy-wide benefits.

Robust domestic privacy laws that manage risks and maximise opportunities and the proper enforcement of security protocols through laws offer a way of ensuring data restrictions don’t negatively impact businesses and trade flows.

At the centre of all of this lies building a trustworthy environment where mutual assistance is offered and data-sharing agreements and contracts are negotiated bilaterally and multilaterally. In essence, government backdoors that erode trust in the internet must be avoided under any circumstances.

The discussants during the seminar provided unique perspectives and critiques to some of Meltzer’s arguments.

Former diplomat Asoke Mukerji spoke about how interdependent countries were when it came to data flows. He focused on how in addition to maximising the impact of data flows for economic growth, India also needs to look at data and its flow in terms of its socio-economic sustainable development goals, anchored in its inclusive “Sabka saath, Sabka vikas” policy.

The focus of data and data flows in India remains as much on the citizen as on the market, he said.

Bringing an aspect of human nature as well as the issue of the concentration of data in the hands of a few private players, Mudit Kapoor, associate professor at the Indian Statistical Institute, warned of the pitfalls of this free market of digital data flows.

He pointed out that flow of data is distinct from flow of goods and services across borders. This is largely due to the inter-relationship between industry and security concerns of each country. Given the asymmetry in data-sharing rules between companies and government agencies across the world, we are likely to over-simply the true and complex nature of international data flows by treating it like any other commodity or services.

Kapoor also highlighted the markets for fake news and the limited capacity of the governments to regulate such markets. These can have phenomenal implications on institutions in democratic countries.

Avik Sarkar, OSD of the Data Analytics Cell at NITI Aayog, spoke about the digitisation efforts of the government, giving examples of how machine-learning, artificial intelligence and big data analytics could help bring about profound impacts on policies and programmes, especially those in health and early disease prevention.

In order to build the digital economy, India will need to determine a fit-for-purpose regulation especially in privacy, consumer protection, intellectual property and financial regulation. The big push needs to be from the top, ensuring governments at all levels – national, state and local — go digital and consider the delivery of services through digital technologies.

Overall the vibrant debate on this forum and many alike on cross-border data flows in India remains a part of a larger global discussion on the need for an international framework to provide predictability, security and stability of cyberspace.

source:www.brookings.edu

0 comments on “Creative economy has new impetus in digital world”

Creative economy has new impetus in digital world

Fast-paced changes in the digital economy are shaking up the creative industries and producing new opportunities to advance development and diversity.

The intersection of the creative and digital economies – and the emerging opportunities at this nexus – was an important discussion point at a recent services trade fair in Beijing, China, with UNCTAD and the others focusing on how the digital world is shaping new economic and trade models.

The 2018 Beijing International Forum on Creative Economy and Summit on Augmented Reality Industry Development took place as part of the China Trade in Services Fair in Beijing from May 28 to June 1.

“Services are a powerful economic driver,” UNCTAD Deputy Secretary-General Isabelle Durant said during a keynote speech to open the fair “They made up 56% of developing countries’ total GDP in 2016, and 54% of their total employment in 2017.”

UNCTAD Creative Economy Programme Chief Marisa Henderson was also a keynote speaker at the creative economy forum. She was joined by UNCTAD’s Creative Economy Programme team which participated in several side meetings and events to highlight the growing role of the creative economy for economic development.

New engine

The forum was held on 29 May and was jointly hosted by the World Tradepoint Federation and the Beijing Municipal Commission of Commerce with the participation of UNCTAD.

It tackled the theme of how technological innovation promotes the development of creative economy. Participants looked at how augmented reality, technology and the creative industries are combining to form a new engine for economic growth.

Ms. Henderson spoke about the creative economy in the digital era.

“In terms of development, digital creation, distribution and participation have revolutionized the creative and many other industries and are driving new economic and trade models forward,” she said.

“Creative workers and creative content are already integral to bringing the digital world to life – and it is critical that we understand both this contribution and how it promotes socio-economic development.”

Ms. Henderson’s keynote was supported by a presentation by team member, Carolina Quintana, on the trends in international trade in creative industries, led by dynamic markets in East Asia. It focused on the region’s increasing digital content market share in services sectors related to architecture, audio-visuals and personal, cultural and recreational services.

More than 200 people attended the forum, including experts and officials of international organizations, the Chinese public sector, chambers of commerce and enterprises.

Ms. Quintana was also invited to speak at the Beijing Forum on International Industry Development.

At this event she discussed the important integration of the “exhibition industry” in the creative industry ecosystem.

“Exhibitions are an important way to showcase destination and goods and services offerings – especially creative goods and services. They contribute to creative enterprise, trade, export development and tourism, as well as knowledge bases and community cohesion.”

Creative China rising

The fair took place just over six months after the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China (CPC), where the cultural and creative industries were highlighted as one of the main pillars of the national economy.

In his address at the CPC, President Xi Jinping’s issued a call to boost the vitality of the domestic cultural and creative sector by upgrading its industrial structure, fostering major brands and boosting consumption.

China has consistently moved toward a more creative, consumer-driven economy. The value added from China’s culture-related sectors clocking $463.9 billion in 2016 a 13% rise from the previous year, according to data from the National Bureau of Statistics and reported by China Daily.

This value added accounted for 4.14% of China’s gross domestic product (GDP), up 0.17 percentage point from the share in 2015.

“Chinese and more broadly Asian growth represents great opportunities for other developing countries which wish to strengthen cultural exchanges and creative industries cooperation with these fast-growing economies,” Ms. Henderson said.

UNCTAD also took part in meetings with the Beijing Municipal Government to jointly organize a Creative Economy Forum in 2019 and participate in Exhibition Industry International Trade Forum, part of the renowned annual China International Import Fair in Shanghai, due to take place on 6–7 November.

source: http://unctad.org

0 comments on “The iWorld Expo 2018 Themed on Digital Economy Kicked Off in Chengdu”

The iWorld Expo 2018 Themed on Digital Economy Kicked Off in Chengdu

On August 16, 2018, the iWorld Expo 2018 grandly kicked off at the Century City New International Convention and Exhibition Center in Chengdu. During the three-day period, under the theme of “Digital Economy in the New Era”, a wonderful event about artificial intelligence and the mobile Internet ecosystem will come onto stage in three major dimensions: exhibitions, international forums and supporting activities.

The iWorld Expo is supported by the Chengdu Municipal People’s Government, jointly hosted by the Chengdu Municipal Commission of Economy and Information Technology, Chengdu Bureau of Expo Affairs and Management Committee of the Chengdu Hi-tech Development Area, and organized by the International Data Group (IDG). This exhibition has attracted more than 200 domestic and foreign brand exhibitors, 100 industry leaders, 300 news media, and 100,000 visitors.

In the report of the 19th National Congress of the Communist Party of China, there was a proposal to build China’sstrength in digital networks, the digital economy, smart society and the sharing economy and to foster new growth areas and drivers of growth. This marks the advent of golden explosion of data economy era. In addition, recently, the Third Plenary Session of the 11th Sichuan Provincial Party Committee has issued the “Decision of the Sichuan Provincial Committee of the Communist Party of China on Comprehensively Promoting High-Quality Development” and clearly proposed to seize the commanding heights of the digital economy. The theme of the iWorld Expo coincides with the path of Chengdu’s vigorous digital economy, showcasing Chengdu’s ambition and confidence in the digital economy.

Eight exhibition areas are being put on show

Innovation is the first driving force for development. At the iWorld Expo 2018, a large amount of companies have brought the audience their cutting-edge innovations.

Covering an area of 22,000 square meters, the exhibition area consisted of eight major sections, namely artificial intelligence, smart life of the future, virtual reality/augmented reality, innovation and start-ups, smart cities, digital entertainment, and smart hardware and intelligent autos.

With the in-depth development of artificial intelligence, the application of artificial intelligence technology has gradually expanded to more industries and fields such as unmanned vehicles, smart homes, consumer electronics terminals, and education. As the key exhibition area of the iWorld Expo, the artificial intelligence exhibition area covers about 2,500 square meters and gathers well-known enterprises such as BOE, Hammer Technology, Pangolin Robot, Deocean, Codoon, and I Winner, attracting a large audience. Meanwhile, at the BOE booth, the BOE 5.99-inch dynamic suspension flexible AMOLED screen, with a thickness of only 0.03mm and a resolution of 1080×2160, is becoming the star of the BOE booth.

At present, the entire smart car industry has entered a new period of development, with more and more industrial opportunities emerging. In the smart car pavilion, leading companies such as BAIC BJEV, Weizuche, and Auto Financial Service gathered to show the cutting-edge technologies of the future car in smart driving, life service, security protection, location service, car assistance and other systems from different perspectives. BAIC BJEV has demonstrated the new era of national pure electric SUVEX360. In terms of technology, BAIC BJEV has introduced the vehicle-based artificial intelligence “Darwin System”, which is a self-learning and self-growth vehicle intelligent technology system independently developed by BAIC BJEV by integrating artificial intelligence and deep learning.

In addition, Tianfu Software Park and Techcode Global Industry Incubator also come onto the stage of the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Exhibition Area to showcase the power of innovation and entrepreneurship to the public.

The international forum created smart peak feast

The digital economy has brought new opportunities for the transformation of traditional industries. Meanwhile, the information economy, represented by a series of high-tech technologies such as cloud computing, big data and artificial intelligence, is becoming the core of the development of the digital economy. How does the digital economy integrate with the traditional industries? What new formats and new models will the digital economy bring forward? The iWorld Expo is showcasing numerous ideas from a range of mobile internet industries.

Synchronizing the opening ceremony are the 16th China International Software Cooperation Conference and iWorld Conference 2018. Participants at the forums include representatives from National Ministries and Commissions, Sichuan Provincial Party and Government, Chengdu Municipal Party and Government, Foreign consular agencies in Chinaattended this eye-catching forum, along with other significant visitors from pioneering enterprises, scientific research institutions, advanced academic and industrial organizations at home and abroad.

Liu Liedong, Deputy Mayor of Chengdu Government, shared his analytic and profound opinions at his speech. Mr. Liu holds that China is facing with an essential opportunity for scientific and technological revolution and industrial innovation. Information network technology has become an important engine driving economic and social development, and software acts as the core and soul of the new generation of information network technology, playing a more and more significant part in a new round of development in Chengdu. Accordingly, the exhibition will fully perform its characteristics as internationalization and specialization, armed with stronger interaction and experience, aiming to promote interpersonal communication and idea-sharing. Chengdu is making full preparation for providing high-level services and heading for a promising future.

Jennifer Xu, Vice President of IDG Asia, delivered a speech on behalf of the host organization. From her words, it is at the third year that iWorld has landed in Chengdu led by IDG. The exhibition hands out a gathering platform for both new and old friends to make joint efforts for developing emerging technic industry and innovative entrepreneurship in Chengdu. Open to the whole world, iWorld aims to boost emerging industries and especially the advantages of high-tech innovation and entrepreneurship, achieving a global appraised brand of Chengdu.

Nine parallel forums are held, including “Linking the Future” Block Chain Summit, VR/AR: a perfect mix of hardware and software, Global Creative Mobile Internet Development Competition (Chengdu Station), Science and Technology Innovation Summit, Changing the Future  Crossover Artificial Intelligence, Build the development of business space with new consumption mode and new experience, Elite Strategic Layout – the Match Point of Internet Industry, Intelligent Road of Intelligent Vehicle. Internet experts from both home and abroad gather together to discuss the development of digital economy under the new era of artificial intelligence.

Featured events ignite the passion of the exhibition

The iWorld Expo 2018 brings not only feasts of innovative technology and ideas to the audience, but also a wonderful journey of smart technology. Various special events take turns to ignite the entire scene, which are quite amazing.

As the classic old-fashioned activities of iWorld Expo, “The Best 2018 Award” and “Talent Award” still continue to be wonderful as they were in previous years. The authoritative selection of high-quality mobile Internet products manufacturers and excellent developers and technicians reserve a new force for the development of the industry.

In addition, iWorld e-sports stage an eye-catching performance. The two popular game projects, including King Gloryand StarCraft, attract top-notched players and wellknown teams from both home and abroad to launch a fierce confrontation and improve the interactive viewing experience of the live events through the on-site esports game.

The Robot Fighting Competition highlight this year’s variety show. By following the trend of the times, iWorld Expo 2018 staged Battletech: The Crescent Hawk’s Inception, a fighting robot carnival full of fun and technology. 36 top teams from all over the world are fighting for the squad and vying for the crown, thus giving the audience a unique viewing experience.

In conclusion, the iWorld Expo 2018 boasts cool smart technology products, innovative ideas from opinion leaders, and fascinating interactive activities.

source: www.prnewswire.com

0 comments on “Digital economy plays key role in high-quality growth (China)”

Digital economy plays key role in high-quality growth (China)

chinaChina’s manufacturing industry is aiming to transform itself from “Quantity” to “Quality”. The key strategy is to develop a digital economy, said Li Yizhong, the former minister from China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology on Sunday.

Speaking at the 2018 World Forum on Scientific and Technological Innovation in Beijing,Li said “A digital economy means a deep integration of Information technology (IT) and the manufacturing industry.”

“It is the trend of a global economy as well as a national strategy for a high-quality growth in manufacturing and internet development,’ he added.

Then, how to develop a digital economy?

Li noted that cutting-edge technologies like big data, internet, cloud computing, and Artificial Intelligence (AI) need to be closely integrated with the manufacturing industry to develop new products and business models.

There are three areas where China’s digital economy has developed the most in recent years, Li summarized, firstly, the IT industry has seen a fast growth and contributed 8 percent to the overall GDP growth last year.

Secondly, enterprises have played bigger roles in developing a digital economy. They have realized the significance of the integration between manufacturing and IT. For instance, Alibaba has rolled out an industrial system that integrated the internet and its companies. The IT industry includes telecom manufacturing, communication services, software and the internet industries.

Thirdly, the benchmarks in digitalization have been improved. For example, indoor broadband penetration has reached 86.7 percent while mobile broadband penetration has risen to 86.3 percent, and the internet surfing fee has been reduced by 46.2 percent, which has exceeded the goals set for 2020.

The number of robots used by every 10,000 workers on average has been increased from 23 in 2013 to 50 as of now, which is close to the world’s averages. The patents held by every 10,000 citizens on average have doubled since 2013. Moreover, enterprises hold over 60 percent of the overall patents.

He also pointed out the challenges faced by digital economy developments.

Core technologies are still controlled by other nations. The Chinese economic structure is still at the low-end. There are significant gaps between China and other developed countries in chips, integrated circuits, software, and data processing techniques. Ninety-five percent of high-end chips are from overseas. Therefore, technological innovations are vital for developing a digital economy.

Most enterprises lack awareness when it comes to digital transformation. They need technical assistance and support. Their understandings of how technologies could enhance productivity require further education. Meanwhile, tech companies lack the knowledge of the industrial demands.

Li suggested strengthening the communication and education for digital transformation among enterprises and leading industrial enterprises by collaborating with internet giants to develop new applications.

On the one hand, interdisciplinary talents who have both knowledgeable of technologies like big data and have the industrial expertise are extremely scarce. On the other hand, loads of traditional workers have been laid off. In France, 3 million jobs will disappear because of digitalization. While in the Guiyang hi-tech industrial development area, 42,000 jobs were created by the digital economy and related industries, Li said.

source: http://en.xfafinance.com