Category Archives: cybersecurity

Simplilearn to Train College Recruits on Digital Economy Skills (India)

Mission-critical skills such as big data, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cloud computing, and digital marketing are ones that enterprises are increasingly turning to fresh graduates to fill

Campus and entry level recruiting is a critical component of every corporate HR strategy but often involves many months of onboarding and mentoring to get these employees productive. Simplilearn offers a New-Hire Training Initiative that significantly shortens this time-to-productivity via a structured training curriculum for campus recruits that they can complete before their first day on the job, or within their first couple of weeks.

Simplilearn focuses exclusively on digital-economy skills such as big data, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cloud computing, and digital marketing. These mission-critical skills are also ones that enterprises are increasingly turning to fresh graduates to fill.

Simplilearn’s new program enables organizations to help their recent on-campus recruits become job-ready (and even certified) with necessary technology skills, gained through Simplilearn’s online training courses prior to onboarding of the new employee.

“Campus hiring has never been more critical. With today’s rapid technology changes, it has become essential to ensure young professionals are up-to-date with the digital skills they will need to have an immediate impact at their new companies,” said Krishna Kumar, Founder and CEO of Simplilearn.

“Offering our vast experience in the latest technologies, Simplilearn is well-suited and proud to help Fortune 500 companies and other organizations bridge the gaps in skills and productivity that often come when onboarding new employees fresh from academia,” he added.

During their final semester in their college or university degree programs, recruits will undertake this training, following predefined learning paths that match their upcoming job roles. In addition to online videos and instructor-led lessons, the courses also include practical applied projects and assessments that are relevant in the high-demand fields such as data analysts, programmers, developers,

Simplilearn has partnered with leading IT/ITes, consulting, internet retail companies and Global System Integrators to support their new hire training initiatives. Also, as part of the company’s core offerings, the Simplilearn Digital Transformation Academy covers all aspects of people, process and technology to help organizations achieve competencies in digital technologies and applications.

The Digital Transformation Academy is designed to be customizable across a wide variety of industries and for all employee and management levels and roles while delivering on Simplilearn’ s outcome-centric, high engagement learning approach.

source: www.dqindia.com

Digital Economy is the Key to Realizing Indonesia into the Big Five of the World Economy

IndonesiaIn an oration entitled “Leap Frog Indonesia Through Digital Economy”, Rudiantara revealed that the development of a digital economic ecosystem is the key to realizing the nation’s economy towards the ranks of the world’s top five economies.

“The experience of a number of startup companies or startups that have grown up like Gojek, Tokopedia, Bukalapak and Traveloka shows that information and communication technology is the main booster rocket that can make a leap frog from zero, passing many stages at once, “To reach a point farther than what other conventional companies can achieve,” said Rudiantara.

To overcome the widening welfare gap in the world today, Rudiantara also urged the world to carry out a global movement. This has been conveyed by Rudiantara at the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) forum in Korea.

One way is through the adoption of innovative digital economic business models and strategies to enable shared economy, digitalization of labor, and financial inclusion. This proposal departs from the experiences of a number of Indonesian startups which prove that digitalization can be directed towards empowering the workforce through new ways.

Rudiantara also mentioned that the digital economy in Indonesia in 2020 is expected to reach 130 billion US dollars or Rp 1,831 trillion. With these achievements, the next two years the digital economy will contribute around 11% of Indonesia’s gross domestic product.

“But of course it’s not as easy as turning your palm to achieve all of that. There are at least seven main issues in the digital economy that must be a common concern. These seven issues are human capital, startup funding, taxation, cyber security, ICT infrastructure, consumer protection, and logistics, “said Rudiantara.

According to Rudiantara, what the government has to do to meet the big changes in the economy and business is to cut regulations a lot and create an ecosystem that provides broad opportunities for innovation to develop.

Rudiantara added, leadership in the digital era must be pursued with at least three principles, namely less of a regulator, by simplifying regulations, simplifying and eliminating permits; more of a facilitator, by providing affirmative policies in developing infrastructure, encouraging digital entrepreneurship, and growing digital economic talents; and more of an accelerator, by accelerating the growth of new digital startups and other business sectors, especially MSMEs.

“The government and the education world must work hand in hand to grow and assist young people to have a passion for technology and become a workforce that has digital skills that are able to view community problems as a challenge to be solved and monetized,” said Rudiantara.

Some time ago, Gojek Indonesia launched Go-Viet in Hanoi, Vietnam. According to Rudiantara, this showed the ability of the nation’s younger generation to solve the problems of modern humanity.

“In the range of the digital economy that is still very young, our nation’s younger people have been able to carve out legacy that is not only sweet to remember, but also surely will inspire the achievements of other nationals in the digital realm of the world,” said Rudiantara.

According to him, this phenomenon also proved that digital space in Indonesia has the same opportunities as other countries in the world. In an increasingly digital world, the perspective of the market must be broader.

Meanwhile, to help prepare Indonesia’s human resources in supporting digital transformation and improving the digital economy, in the near future the Ministry of Communication and Information will launch “Digital Talent Scholarship”. This program is in the form of intensive training scholarships by holding five universities in Indonesia, including Unpad.

source: www.unpad.ac.id

Regulating a Digital Economy: An Indian Perspective

The “fourth industrial revolution” which has been characterised by end-to-end digitalisation has led to unprecedented increases in connectivity and data flows. By 2017, Asia had the largest number of internet users in the world, with 1.9 billion people online.

Joshua Meltzer, Senior Fellow, Global Economy and Development at the Brookings Institution, spoke about regulating the digital economy at a Brookings India Development Seminar on April 20, 2018.

In 2014 cross-border data flows were 45 times larger than in 2005, raising global gross domestic product (GDP) by approximately 3.5 per cent, equivalent to $2.8 trillion dollars in 2014. According to the World Bank, it is expected that a 10 per cent increase in internet penetration in the exporting country would lead to a 1.9 per cent increase in exports. In fact, in the U.S. alone internet and data use increased GDP by 3.4-4.8 per cent, as per estimates of the United States International Trade Commission.

In India, the digital economy is expected to contribute $550bn-$1tr in GDP by 2025, and add 1.5-2 million jobs by 2018 through its Digital India initiative.

The economic opportunities from technologies such as cloud computing, big data and the internet of things are also not limited to the IT sector but are economy-wide, including in sectors such as manufacturing and agriculture, Meltzer argued based on his working paper “Regulating for a digital economy: Understanding the importance of cross-border data flows in Asia”.

Over 40 per cent of India’s goods and services exports consist of software services and IT-enabled services (ITES) from financial analysis, accounting, medical transcription to the provision of applications for smartphones. Cross-border data flows remain vital for India’s exports of services.

Governments, however, are increasingly introducing measures that restrict data flows.

In order to build the digital economy, India will need to determine a fit-for-purpose regulation especially in privacy, consumer protection, intellectual property and financial regulation.

Cross-border data flow restrictions can take one of several forms, from restrictions on data being transferred outside national borders and requiring prior consent for global transfers. According to a study by Bauer et al, the cost of proposed and enacted data localisation measures in India would reduce its GDP by 0.1 per cent.

Meltzer argued that restrictions on cross-border data flows harm both the competitiveness of the country implementing the policies and other countries that rely on that data from those countries.

In India, a few examples of government regulations and rules include the Information Technology Rules (2011) that limits cross-border transfer of sensitive personal data. The National Data Sharing and Accessibility Policy (2012) which requires government data be stored in India, particularly for cloud providers. The Companies (Accounts) Rules (2014) which requires backups of financial information, if stored overseas, to be stored in India. The National Telecom M2M roadmap (2015) which requires gateways and app servers that serve Indian customers to be located in India.

Data flow restrictions are enacted with several goals in mind – from protecting citizens’ personal privacy, to ensuring national security and protecting local businesses. The capacity to move large quantities of data seamlessly and rapidly across borders can undermine domestic regulatory standards in areas such as privacy and consumer protection.

Meltzer argued that such data restrictions limit access to digital commerce networks and online resources and the ability of businesses to synthesise large data sets, on a wider scale they affect business models, reduce productivity, innovation as well as business competitiveness by forcing businesses to invest in lower quality data facilities.

So, while this wave of digitisation has massive economy wide positive impacts, data localisation could have massive economic costs, he added.

Meltzer recommended that the realisation of legitimate regulatory goals such as privacy and security must happen alongside maximising the economic and trade opportunities cross-border data flows offer. The focus for regulators needs to be using existing technologies to harness economy-wide benefits.

Robust domestic privacy laws that manage risks and maximise opportunities and the proper enforcement of security protocols through laws offer a way of ensuring data restrictions don’t negatively impact businesses and trade flows.

At the centre of all of this lies building a trustworthy environment where mutual assistance is offered and data-sharing agreements and contracts are negotiated bilaterally and multilaterally. In essence, government backdoors that erode trust in the internet must be avoided under any circumstances.

The discussants during the seminar provided unique perspectives and critiques to some of Meltzer’s arguments.

Former diplomat Asoke Mukerji spoke about how interdependent countries were when it came to data flows. He focused on how in addition to maximising the impact of data flows for economic growth, India also needs to look at data and its flow in terms of its socio-economic sustainable development goals, anchored in its inclusive “Sabka saath, Sabka vikas” policy.

The focus of data and data flows in India remains as much on the citizen as on the market, he said.

Bringing an aspect of human nature as well as the issue of the concentration of data in the hands of a few private players, Mudit Kapoor, associate professor at the Indian Statistical Institute, warned of the pitfalls of this free market of digital data flows.

He pointed out that flow of data is distinct from flow of goods and services across borders. This is largely due to the inter-relationship between industry and security concerns of each country. Given the asymmetry in data-sharing rules between companies and government agencies across the world, we are likely to over-simply the true and complex nature of international data flows by treating it like any other commodity or services.

Kapoor also highlighted the markets for fake news and the limited capacity of the governments to regulate such markets. These can have phenomenal implications on institutions in democratic countries.

Avik Sarkar, OSD of the Data Analytics Cell at NITI Aayog, spoke about the digitisation efforts of the government, giving examples of how machine-learning, artificial intelligence and big data analytics could help bring about profound impacts on policies and programmes, especially those in health and early disease prevention.

In order to build the digital economy, India will need to determine a fit-for-purpose regulation especially in privacy, consumer protection, intellectual property and financial regulation. The big push needs to be from the top, ensuring governments at all levels – national, state and local — go digital and consider the delivery of services through digital technologies.

Overall the vibrant debate on this forum and many alike on cross-border data flows in India remains a part of a larger global discussion on the need for an international framework to provide predictability, security and stability of cyberspace.

source:www.brookings.edu

Success of digital economy lies in transparency

tabKenya’s digital economy has experienced significant developments in recent years with new applications powering themselves to ubiquitous status soon after launch.

The over 20 million Kenyans who own smartphones can effortlessly hail a taxi, order a fresh meal, an e-book or buy a television set from their living room or behind the office desk.

This phenomenon is not unique to our geography; last year, global e-commerce sales topped the $2.29 trillion mark, despite the fact that half the world’s population is offline.

Technological advances ultimately make life easier for everybody but, like a double-edged sword, cut both ways – exposing consumers to a raft of risks which differ in magnitude.

Indeed, 70 per cent of global e-commerce customers are afraid that their digital activity is not secure. Data breaches and online fraud and scams, have been widely reported in the West, rank on the extreme end of the risk scale.

According to Consumers International, a global organisation made up of consumer groups including the Competition Authority of Kenya (CAK), over half a billion digital personal records were lost or stolen in 2015.

Despite this exposure, over 30 countries have not enacted cybercrime laws.

On the other hand, consumers sometimes receive goods of lower quality than marketed, are billed much more than was advertised or battle retailers holding onto refunds arising from botched transactions.

Unlike data breaches, it is easier to resolve these disagreements. However, it would be much better if all these incidences did not materialise to begin with; that the seller and buyer enter and exit an online transaction content.

That way, and with the catalytic backing of an increasingly extensive and affordable broadband network, e-commerce would blossom, even pulling the population currently shying away from trading online.

The demonstrable centrality of the digital economy globally, and the threats and opportunities it holds, compelled the Consumers International to theme this year’s World Consumer Rights Day on this industry.

This commemorative event, held annually on March 15, aims at promoting the basic rights of all consumers, and ensuring that those rights are respected and protected.

This year’s theme ‘Making digital marketplaces fairer’, will see consumer bodies push for digital market places that are more accessible, safer and fairer to consumers across the globe. Given the aforementioned challenges, the onus is on consumer protection agencies like the CAK to sensitise the public on these dangers, how best to protect themselves and channels of recourse when harmed.

Increasingly, the CAK have received and investigated various complaints in regard to digital platforms. These complaints informed the Authority’s move to oblige providers of digital and mobile based services to be more transparent to the consumers insofar as transaction costs are concerned.

Previously, members of the public were only made aware of the cost of a service after the fact – a setup which greatly disenfranchised customers to the benefit of profit-seeking service providers.

On a regulation front, the fact of the matter is that e-commerce is an extremely fluid industry.

Regulators are more often than not left playing catch-up, racing to learn how a new application works, its impact on the economy and the necessary regulation, if any, needed.

The  last December, after a protracted hearing, ruled that Uber is a taxi service, despite the firm arguing it is a digital platform and should remain immune to some laws.

Indeed, the entry launch of Uber in Kenya upended the taxi model, necessitating a multi-agency intervention to prosecute a raft of complaints raised by various stakeholders.

At CAK, we are committed to educating the public about their rights as part of our vision of achieving an economy with globally efficient markets and enhanced consumer welfare.

This education and sensitization remains critical for our young and growing economy, and will definitely continue even after the World Consumer Rights Day 2018.

source: https://www.businessdailyafrica.com/analysis/columnists/Success-of-digital-economy-lies-in-transparency/4259356-4341922-tbrliaz/index.html