Category Archives: data privacy

Simplilearn to Train College Recruits on Digital Economy Skills (India)

Mission-critical skills such as big data, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cloud computing, and digital marketing are ones that enterprises are increasingly turning to fresh graduates to fill

Campus and entry level recruiting is a critical component of every corporate HR strategy but often involves many months of onboarding and mentoring to get these employees productive. Simplilearn offers a New-Hire Training Initiative that significantly shortens this time-to-productivity via a structured training curriculum for campus recruits that they can complete before their first day on the job, or within their first couple of weeks.

Simplilearn focuses exclusively on digital-economy skills such as big data, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cloud computing, and digital marketing. These mission-critical skills are also ones that enterprises are increasingly turning to fresh graduates to fill.

Simplilearn’s new program enables organizations to help their recent on-campus recruits become job-ready (and even certified) with necessary technology skills, gained through Simplilearn’s online training courses prior to onboarding of the new employee.

“Campus hiring has never been more critical. With today’s rapid technology changes, it has become essential to ensure young professionals are up-to-date with the digital skills they will need to have an immediate impact at their new companies,” said Krishna Kumar, Founder and CEO of Simplilearn.

“Offering our vast experience in the latest technologies, Simplilearn is well-suited and proud to help Fortune 500 companies and other organizations bridge the gaps in skills and productivity that often come when onboarding new employees fresh from academia,” he added.

During their final semester in their college or university degree programs, recruits will undertake this training, following predefined learning paths that match their upcoming job roles. In addition to online videos and instructor-led lessons, the courses also include practical applied projects and assessments that are relevant in the high-demand fields such as data analysts, programmers, developers,

Simplilearn has partnered with leading IT/ITes, consulting, internet retail companies and Global System Integrators to support their new hire training initiatives. Also, as part of the company’s core offerings, the Simplilearn Digital Transformation Academy covers all aspects of people, process and technology to help organizations achieve competencies in digital technologies and applications.

The Digital Transformation Academy is designed to be customizable across a wide variety of industries and for all employee and management levels and roles while delivering on Simplilearn’ s outcome-centric, high engagement learning approach.

source: www.dqindia.com

Digital Economy is the Key to Realizing Indonesia into the Big Five of the World Economy

IndonesiaIn an oration entitled “Leap Frog Indonesia Through Digital Economy”, Rudiantara revealed that the development of a digital economic ecosystem is the key to realizing the nation’s economy towards the ranks of the world’s top five economies.

“The experience of a number of startup companies or startups that have grown up like Gojek, Tokopedia, Bukalapak and Traveloka shows that information and communication technology is the main booster rocket that can make a leap frog from zero, passing many stages at once, “To reach a point farther than what other conventional companies can achieve,” said Rudiantara.

To overcome the widening welfare gap in the world today, Rudiantara also urged the world to carry out a global movement. This has been conveyed by Rudiantara at the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) forum in Korea.

One way is through the adoption of innovative digital economic business models and strategies to enable shared economy, digitalization of labor, and financial inclusion. This proposal departs from the experiences of a number of Indonesian startups which prove that digitalization can be directed towards empowering the workforce through new ways.

Rudiantara also mentioned that the digital economy in Indonesia in 2020 is expected to reach 130 billion US dollars or Rp 1,831 trillion. With these achievements, the next two years the digital economy will contribute around 11% of Indonesia’s gross domestic product.

“But of course it’s not as easy as turning your palm to achieve all of that. There are at least seven main issues in the digital economy that must be a common concern. These seven issues are human capital, startup funding, taxation, cyber security, ICT infrastructure, consumer protection, and logistics, “said Rudiantara.

According to Rudiantara, what the government has to do to meet the big changes in the economy and business is to cut regulations a lot and create an ecosystem that provides broad opportunities for innovation to develop.

Rudiantara added, leadership in the digital era must be pursued with at least three principles, namely less of a regulator, by simplifying regulations, simplifying and eliminating permits; more of a facilitator, by providing affirmative policies in developing infrastructure, encouraging digital entrepreneurship, and growing digital economic talents; and more of an accelerator, by accelerating the growth of new digital startups and other business sectors, especially MSMEs.

“The government and the education world must work hand in hand to grow and assist young people to have a passion for technology and become a workforce that has digital skills that are able to view community problems as a challenge to be solved and monetized,” said Rudiantara.

Some time ago, Gojek Indonesia launched Go-Viet in Hanoi, Vietnam. According to Rudiantara, this showed the ability of the nation’s younger generation to solve the problems of modern humanity.

“In the range of the digital economy that is still very young, our nation’s younger people have been able to carve out legacy that is not only sweet to remember, but also surely will inspire the achievements of other nationals in the digital realm of the world,” said Rudiantara.

According to him, this phenomenon also proved that digital space in Indonesia has the same opportunities as other countries in the world. In an increasingly digital world, the perspective of the market must be broader.

Meanwhile, to help prepare Indonesia’s human resources in supporting digital transformation and improving the digital economy, in the near future the Ministry of Communication and Information will launch “Digital Talent Scholarship”. This program is in the form of intensive training scholarships by holding five universities in Indonesia, including Unpad.

source: www.unpad.ac.id

Facebook is shaking up its efforts to connect a billion new users to the internet

facebookThere’s changes afoot at Facebook’s wildly ambitious efforts to connect the so-called “next billion” internet users, who are expected to mostly come from emerging markets.

On Friday, the social networking firm revealed that it is bringing all its connectivity efforts together under one umbrella — called, aptly, Facebook Connectivity. It has also hired an executive from wireless firm Ruckus Networks to lead the program, Dan Rabinovitsj.

“Let’s get the next billion people on the internet!” his LinkedIn job description now reads.

The news was first reported by tech news site CNET, which spoke to Yael Maguire, the VP of engineering for Connectivity, about the shakeup.

“There’s no silver bullet for connecting the world,” Maguire told CNET. “There isn’t going to be a magic technology or business plan or single regulatory policy change that’s going to change this. We really believe that it is a wide and diverse set of efforts that’s required to do this.”

Facebook has long harbored ambitions of bringing internet to billions of people across the developing world for the first time — but it hasn’t always gone smoothly.

In June, the company announced it was ditching its plans to build its own giant drones that could beam down wireless internet after Business Insider reported on upheaval at the project. And Free Basics, a service to bring free internet services to people in the developing world, has often been criticized for the appearance of promoting Facebook’s own apps over those of competitors.

Several of Facebook’s existing programs will be rolled under the Connectivity banner, including:

  • Free Basics — a program to provide free access to select internet services to cellphone users in emerging markets.
  • Terragraph — a project to develop high-speed wireless internet for urban environments.
  • Telecom Infra Project — efforts to develop better telecommunications infrastructure, working with other telecom firms.
  • High-Altitude Connectivity — its efforts in the field of high-altitude aerial vehicles (including satellites) that can provide internet, which continue even after the closure of its drone program.

Facebook Connectivity’s website

source: https://www.mysanantonio.com

EU moves to remove barriers to data flows

eu-data-protection(Reuters) The European Union will seek to break down barriers to the flow of data between businesses in future trade deals, as it tries to promote a more digital economy while also protecting privacy.

Cross-border data flows are key to most businesses. These can include moving around employee information, sharing credit card details for online transactions, and identifying people’s browsing habits to serve them targeted advertisements.

The EU has drafted provisions, seen by Reuters, to be inserted in future trade agreements which tackle protectionist measures by third countries restricting the flow of data. They should also ensure that the bloc’s strict data protection rules will not be undermined.

In addition, the articles on data flows and data protection will be excluded from any investment court set up as part of a trade deal to settle disputes, ensuring that data protection issues will be under the jurisdiction of the EU’s highest court.

“Cross-border data flows shall not be restricted between the Parties by … requiring the localisation of data in the Party’s territory for storage or processing,” the provisions say.

They also prohibit the requirement that businesses use specific computing facilities in a country’s territory.

A number of countries have introduced measures forcing companies to store data on local servers, prompting warnings from the technology industry that such moves only serve to balkanise the internet.

Russia said last year that it would block Facebook unless the social network complied with a law requiring websites that store the personal data of Russian citizens to do so on Russian servers.

Data protection is a fundamental right in the EU and therefore cannot be the subject of negotiation in trade deals. But the growing digitalisation of the economy has prompted the EU to look at how it can foster data flows without compromising privacy.

The EU normally looks to facilitate commercial data flows by recognising a third country’s privacy framework as equivalent to that in the bloc, meaning businesses can easily transfer and store data overseas.

Only 12 currently meet the standard, and the US had to negotiate with Brussels for over two years to be granted so-called “adequacy” status.

The EU is negotiating a data transfer deal with Japan which it hopes to conclude this year.

“These horizontal provisions – once included in future trade and investment agreements – will for the first time provide for a straightforward prohibition of protectionist barriers to cross-border data flows, in full compliance with and without prejudice to the EU’s data protection and data privacy rules,” the European Commission wrote in a letter to a member of the European Parliament on Friday.