0 comments on “$1 Trillion Boost to Asean GDP From Digital Economy”

$1 Trillion Boost to Asean GDP From Digital Economy

The digital revolution that has become such a powerful force for global change is still in early days in the ASEAN member states. ASEAN’s digital economy represents only 7% of its GDP, compared with 16% in China and 35% in the US, Bain said in a report on Monday. However, the region has much to gain by laying the foundation for the digital economy to power and accelerate intraregional trade and growth (what we term “digital integration”). Digital integration will be critical for ASEAN businesses to compete at home and overseas—it has the power to turn small and midsize enterprises (SMEs) into regional and global players. Digital integration could deliver a $1 trillion rise in GDP in ASEAN by 2025.

Getting there will take a significant effort. While enhancements have been made across ASEAN, broadband coverage needs to improve in rural areas, and advanced digital tools need to become more affordable for SMEs, among other challenges. Also, to help individuals and businesses across the region benefit from digital opportunities, member states will need to accelerate and coordinate their initiatives. The results can be dramatic: ASEAN businesses would have the opportunity to leapfrog those in other major economies.

bain infographic

content nain

source: www.bain.com

Report here

0 comments on “Telkom SA calls for digital economy summit (South Africa)”

Telkom SA calls for digital economy summit (South Africa)

-fs-Sipho-Maseko-1-2018.xlTelkom South Africa has called for a multi-sectoral digital economy summit to be convened and attended by operators, the industry regulator, vertical market representatives, tertiary education institutions and other telecommunications industry stakeholders.

In his keynote address to delegates at the 2018 Southern Africa Telecommunication Networks and Applications Conference (SATNAC), Group CEO Telkom SA Sipho Maseko said this would provide a forum to address the question of how to generate economic growth.

The question of how relevant stakeholders will contribute had to be asked and answered.

These questions are not only for operators said Maseko, and it is envisaged that the platform would serve as a forum for all stakeholders to state their position.

Maseko identified several drivers of economy including investment in infrastructure to deliver ubiquitous connectivity, skills and subject matter experts across the spectrum, fair competition and regulation.

In addition to the role of data within an ever-changing market and the influence of the digitised consumer, Maseko also touched upon the issue of regulation.

Telkom SA remains embroiled in a dispute with ICASA (Independent Communications Authority of SA) regarding plans to reduce call termination rates – the price mobile and fixed network operators charge each other for terminating calls between networks.

According to a recent ITWeb report, the company has affirmed that unless the regulator’s draft call termination rates are not amended, it may have to change its business model, stop operations in rural areas and possibly have to cut jobs.

It has reportedly issued a counter-proposal to ICASA and stated that under the regulator’s proposed changes, it would “continue to effectively subsidise the larger mobile network operators.”

Government’s intention and objectives behind the wireless open access network proposed in the draft Electronic Communications Amendment Bill has also attracted widespread attention within the local telecommunications space.

“Regulation and policy can be a big enabler for data growth… but regulation must keep up with the market and tech advances. Regulators sometimes almost exclude themselves from the debate. The question is how do we get the economy to recover?” said Maseko.

He also cautioned that call termination rates and proposals have not recognised the fact that the market has converged, and regulation has to enable investment.

source: www.itwebafrica.com

0 comments on “New Vision for A Global Digital Economy Emerges At Smart China Expo (event)”

New Vision for A Global Digital Economy Emerges At Smart China Expo (event)

smart china expoIndustry leaders attending the first Smart China Expo (SCE 2018) in China’s western city of Chongqing have articulated a new vision for how the world’s digital economy will evolve at the event’s Global Digital Economy Summit, a forum that brought together 650 participants under the theme “New Digital Economy, New Growth Engine.” Speakers projected a future in which Big Data reshapes the way businesses and governments operate, cooperate, and compete.

New forces being unleashed by current innovations threaten to disrupt the existing economic growth models of many industries, as digital information will rise to the same status as land and capital as a key element of productivity. Meanwhile, governments around the world are building “smart infrastructure” as they seek to use technology to upgrade power grids, railways, ports and toll roads, and seek to integrate everything. Big Data technology also helps build “smart cities,” boost consumption, and improve social welfare programs ranging from education to philanthropy to healthcare.

“Artificial Intelligence (AI) could be a big contributor to healthcare,” said Piero Scaruffi, a cognitive scientist, AI expert and writer of A History of Silicon Valley. Piero, believes that technology will make a better society and that AI will slash the cost of healthcare. “When we talk about machines saving lives, that’s real progress,” he said.

Kate Garman, smart city policy adviser to the Mayor of Seattle, shared insights into smart city management at SCE 2018. “Smart cities have challenged cities to be innovative. It has been the inspiration for cities to jump forward using technology,” she said.

Despite huge progress, China still faces many hurdles in developing a digital economy, said Li Yizhong, former head of China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT). “Chinese manufacturers lag in the application of smart manufacturing, and businesses need to accelerate their digitalization process.” Li pointed out that “issues like how to balance improving efficiency and protecting jobs, and how to protect commercial secretes in the age of Internet also remain challenging.”

Alibaba Vice President Liu Song predicted that over the next 10 years, AI and the Internet of Thongs (IoT) will replace mobile technologies as the world’s defining digital technologies, which is why Alibaba is heavily investing in three areas: Big Data, network synergy and smart data. Liu’s view was echoed by Cai Yongzhong, Chairman of Deloitte China, who urged traditional businesses to actively embrace innovation in the face of the upcoming digital revolution.

For more information, please visit http://www.ichongqing.info/smart-china-expo/.

About Smart China Expo (SCE)

Held Chongqing, the Smart China Expo (SCE) is a world-class, national-level Expo that supports the development of Big Data and smart technologies in Western China. High-profiled guests joined the event including 4 political heavyweights, 22 national government officials that above ministerial-level, 58 persons who are in charge of institutions under national departments, and 407 senior representatives from top tier global brands such as Siemens, IBM, Microsoft, Qualcomm, Baidu, Alibaba, Tencent, Huawei and more.

source: www.multivu.com

0 comments on “Surviving in a digital economy: A study of the consultant brokerage industry”

Surviving in a digital economy: A study of the consultant brokerage industry

The master thesis is written by Andreas Pettersson and concludes the author’s studies
in Industrial and Management Engineering with a focus on innovation and strategic
business development, Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.

Purpose – The purpose of this master thesis is to identify critical factors and create guidelines for traditional consultant brokerage firms to stay competitive in a digital economy.

Methodology – This qualitative study with an abductive approach, gathered data primary from semi-structured interviews. A total 18 interviews were conducted with travel agency executives as well as buyers, sellers, and matchmakers of consultant services. Collected data were analyzed using thematic coding.

Findings – The main findings of this show that traditional matchmakers can take actions to stay competitive if a digital platform enters the market. In addition, the study suggests proactive and reactive measures that organizations can take to address these disruptive forces.

Theoretical implications – The study will provide an understanding of consultant brokerage and their function as a matchmaker in the marketplace. Besides, it will provide an insight into how some traditional matchmakers can survive in a digital economy.

Practical implications – This thesis will provide managers with concrete guidelines on how to react in the event of disintermediation of a matchmaker market.

Keywords – Disintermediation, Business strategy, Reintermediation, Matchmakers, Intermediates, Consultants, Brokers

Paper type – Master thesis

More/source:http://ltu.diva-portal.org

0 comments on “Irish education system needs ‘profound changes’ to secure digital future”

Irish education system needs ‘profound changes’ to secure digital future

The managing director of Accenture Ireland has warned that Ireland needs to make “profound” changes to its education system to ensure the country is equipped to secure the next wave of jobs in the digital economy.

Alastair Blair, who is also chair of Ibec’s digital economy policy committee, says the advent of artificial intelligence, virtual reality and augmented reality may require a move to a more modular education system to ensure the future workforce has the necessary depth and breadth of skills.

“Traditionally, Ireland has had access to deep skills and the availability of a young and educated workforce,” said Blair, who believes the protection of digital jobs requires a long-term commitment from government, academia and industry working together.

“There is a real opportunity for Ireland to position itself well. However, there is a need for a profound change to our education system to take advantage of the next wave of jobs,” he said.

Blair said Accenture, which acquired Irish creative agency Rothco for a reported €20m this year, is targeting further acquisitions as it is set to mark 50 years in Ireland.

source: www.independent.ie

0 comments on “An organisation in Iraq is working with young people to help “bring the country to a more digital economy””

An organisation in Iraq is working with young people to help “bring the country to a more digital economy”

Re:Coded was founded in 2016 and holds courses for people wishing to learn more about coding.

Zahra Shah, Program Manager at the organisation said: “We launched as a coding school to try and upscale youth here and bring them more towards a digital economy especially in Iraq where a lot of the jobs are provided by the government.

“The economy is not doing great, a lot of the money that comes from oil and gas, they’re not using it to rebuild the country and a lot of that is due to corruption unfortunately. But our solution is that there are so many youth here interested in technology.

Zahra Shah, Program Manager at Iraq Re:Coded said there is a need for coding teachers in the country (Re:Coded)

“So we started a school to cater to that need for youths to have access to that education. Even the students that learn computer science at university, they’re not learning properly how to become computer programmers, it’s very theoretical. We fill that gap by teaching android app development.”

Students can take part in Re:Coded’s five month boot camps or the tech entrepreneurship academy. It’s come at a good time for the country, with the start up and tech industry growing.

Ms Shah has seen the growth first hand having moved to Iraq last August. She said: “I’ve seen so much change already. There is a huge co-working space that opened in Baghdad four months ago in addition to our co-working space in Erbil. I feel that there’s more NGOs as well getting with the programme when it comes to technology.

“A lot of our graduates are being employed because they have the tech skills to leverage that and move their projects forward so I am definitely seeing a difference. People are starting to see the benefit of relying more on technology and doing stuff online, freelancing and entrepreneurship.”

Iraq’s tech scene is growing rapidly and Re:Coded is hoping to get as many women onto the scene as possible (REUTERS)

“Iraq is still behind the rest of the middle east in comparison to Dubai, but even just on a grass-roots level I feel it’s growing so quick and i’m really surprised to see how much it’s changed just from being here in a year so in another five years, I see it going a lot further.” A main focus by the organisation is the need to get women involved in coding.

“We always aim for at least 40 percent women across our projects, in our boot camps, we have 40-50 percent, the same with everything we offer. A minimum of 40 percent is our goal,” Ms Shah added.

For those who graduate from the boot camp, the job prospects are huge. Some have found employment with some of the organisation’s sponsors while others have decided to start their own startup. While others have chosen to teach coding themselves.

The country’s tech and startup industry is starting to grow (Re:Coded)

“In our last boot camp, we had 35 students, of those students that were looking for full-time employment, around 90 percent of them have gone into employment especially in the local economy.

0 comments on “Nigeria – the Federal Government to achieve growth with digital economy”

Nigeria – the Federal Government to achieve growth with digital economy

NigeriaNigeria.

The Federal Government has announced plans to achieve an all-inclusive economy by prioritising developmental efforts in the digital economy.

Minister of Communication Adebayo Shittu said in Lagos at the weekend that the move by the Federal Government was to ensure that Nigerians had equal access to government services by using digitalisation.

He said plans were on to establish a Nigeria Postal Services (NIPOST) banking, real estate and insurance company to get Nigerians into a financial inclusive economy.

Shittu, who spoke at a stakeholders’ conference on digital addressing system and address verification system, organised by NIPOST, said: ”We are looking at establishing a NIPOST property and development company to make use of NIPOST underutilised facilities wasting away. It is our plan as part of the general reform to ensure that most of the vacant and unused land are leased out to the public to establish property development. Some of the land will be available to build estates, event centres, garages and others to earn revenue for the Federal Government.”

He said in two years, NIPOST would be the leading Federal Government agency in terms of its influence on the life of every Nigerian, adding that courtesy of its upgraded processes, it would help in bringing in the largest amount of money into the Federal Government’s coffers.

”There are communities, which are about 200 to 300 kilometres away from the state capital. With the help of these offices, people can access government services from their communities. By the time we conclude in establishing these companies, there will be no one who will not be affected positively by NIPOST multifaceted companies,” the minister said.

source: http://thenationonlineng.net

0 comments on “Digital economy plays key role in high-quality growth (China)”

Digital economy plays key role in high-quality growth (China)

chinaChina’s manufacturing industry is aiming to transform itself from “Quantity” to “Quality”. The key strategy is to develop a digital economy, said Li Yizhong, the former minister from China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology on Sunday.

Speaking at the 2018 World Forum on Scientific and Technological Innovation in Beijing,Li said “A digital economy means a deep integration of Information technology (IT) and the manufacturing industry.”

“It is the trend of a global economy as well as a national strategy for a high-quality growth in manufacturing and internet development,’ he added.

Then, how to develop a digital economy?

Li noted that cutting-edge technologies like big data, internet, cloud computing, and Artificial Intelligence (AI) need to be closely integrated with the manufacturing industry to develop new products and business models.

There are three areas where China’s digital economy has developed the most in recent years, Li summarized, firstly, the IT industry has seen a fast growth and contributed 8 percent to the overall GDP growth last year.

Secondly, enterprises have played bigger roles in developing a digital economy. They have realized the significance of the integration between manufacturing and IT. For instance, Alibaba has rolled out an industrial system that integrated the internet and its companies. The IT industry includes telecom manufacturing, communication services, software and the internet industries.

Thirdly, the benchmarks in digitalization have been improved. For example, indoor broadband penetration has reached 86.7 percent while mobile broadband penetration has risen to 86.3 percent, and the internet surfing fee has been reduced by 46.2 percent, which has exceeded the goals set for 2020.

The number of robots used by every 10,000 workers on average has been increased from 23 in 2013 to 50 as of now, which is close to the world’s averages. The patents held by every 10,000 citizens on average have doubled since 2013. Moreover, enterprises hold over 60 percent of the overall patents.

He also pointed out the challenges faced by digital economy developments.

Core technologies are still controlled by other nations. The Chinese economic structure is still at the low-end. There are significant gaps between China and other developed countries in chips, integrated circuits, software, and data processing techniques. Ninety-five percent of high-end chips are from overseas. Therefore, technological innovations are vital for developing a digital economy.

Most enterprises lack awareness when it comes to digital transformation. They need technical assistance and support. Their understandings of how technologies could enhance productivity require further education. Meanwhile, tech companies lack the knowledge of the industrial demands.

Li suggested strengthening the communication and education for digital transformation among enterprises and leading industrial enterprises by collaborating with internet giants to develop new applications.

On the one hand, interdisciplinary talents who have both knowledgeable of technologies like big data and have the industrial expertise are extremely scarce. On the other hand, loads of traditional workers have been laid off. In France, 3 million jobs will disappear because of digitalization. While in the Guiyang hi-tech industrial development area, 42,000 jobs were created by the digital economy and related industries, Li said.

source: http://en.xfafinance.com

0 comments on “Germany – Digital Economy Monitoring report 2018”

Germany – Digital Economy Monitoring report 2018

germany DEMR 2018

The DIGITAL Economy Index provides a number to show the level of digitalisation in the
German economy. It is based on a survey of high-ranking decision-makers from 1,061
businesses. Three aspects are incorporated in the economy index: the use of digital
devices, the state of internal company digitalisation, and the effect of digitalisation on the company.

Report here and  Library

source: www.zew.de

0 comments on “Competition challenges in the digital economy”

Competition challenges in the digital economy

Competition21-750x400Slow productivity growth and rising income inequality have shaped the world economy in a time of rapid technological change. A variety of explanations have emerged to help us understand these related trends, but one overarching theme is the decline in competition.

The combination of increasingly concentrated markets, rising market power of large firms, and slowing business dynamism suggest that competition among firms is weakening. The concern is that the rise of dominant firms will hinder the diffusion of technology and exacerbate income inequality.

Adding to these concerns are two key features of the digital economy—the potential for scale with digital platforms and the growing importance of intangible capital—that, by their very nature, lend themselves to bigger and more dominant firms.

These characteristics of the digital economy present challenges on how we think about and implement competition policy. Policies aimed at ensuring a level playing field and fostering a dynamic and inclusive economy will therefore need to adjust to better reflect a growing reality.

POTENTIAL FOR SCALE WITH DIGITAL PLATFORMS

First, market concentration is especially high in markets with large returns to scale and network effects. Going digital can come with high capital expenditures, like setting up data centers and other digital infrastructure. But it also comes with the ability to reproduce digital offerings instantly and at low or zero marginal cost, implying large returns to scale and lower prices for consumers. When network effects are involved, the potential returns to scale are even greater.

The argument for bigger firms in these markets is that consumers are the biggest winners. Free digital services and a plethora of user data used to customize and cross-sell products help raise consumer welfare and offer greater choice. (In some cases, firms controlling “big data” can extract more consumer surplus through sophisticated algorithmic pricing and customization of offerings.)

Small businesses and entrepreneurs also benefit, the argument goes. Digital giants like Amazon, Google, and Microsoft, among others, reduce startup costs for small firms by offering cloud services and open-source software, make it easier to reach distant markets through their platforms, and offer venture funding and financing.

Due in part to the potential to scale up quickly, the threat of disruption is higher in the digital economy than in the past. Many argue that this threat strengthens competition among big firms as well as smaller firms who can unseat the giants (see herehere, and here).

However, it is not so clear that these arguments for bigger firms always hold. Less than one percent of startups end up as $1 billion companies and are often acquired or imitated by the giants along the way. In addition, industry lines are increasingly blurred as big firms leverage their user’s data to offer a broader range of goods and services, providing more valuable data on spending habits, and, ultimately, reinforcing the competitive advantage of big firms across industries.

A challenge for policymakers and regulators comes when assessing who indeed the biggest beneficiaries are. Diane Coyle of the University of Manchester points out that although the network effects of digital platforms produce real economic welfare gains, it is unclear how big those gains are or who captures them. Advertisers also place great value on free services and, as Luigi Zingales and Guy Rolnik of the University of Chicago notes, users do pay for these services in the form of very valuable information.

More economic tools are needed to quantify consumer benefits in such markets where traditional pricing does not provide the same kind of signals on market power as in other industries. Such assessments would better help policymakers and regulators ensure a level playing field and better distinguish between competitive and anti-competitive behaviors.

GROWING IMPORTANCE OF INTANGIBLE CAPITAL

A second feature of the digital economy that advantages larger firms is the growing importance of intangible capital.

Unlike tangible capital like buildings and equipment, intangible capital is not physical. It consists of ideas, branding, business processes, software, supplier relationships, licensing agreements, and other immaterial assets that generate value for a firm.

As digitization changes business models, firms are placing greater emphasis on intangibles. In the U.S., U.K., and some European economies, intangible investment already exceeds investment in tangibles.

As Jonathan Haskel and Stian Westlake describe in their book Capitalism Without Capital, there are four key economic properties of intangible assets that differentiate them from tangibles. Those properties are “scalability” (multiple people can use them simultaneously), “sunkenness” (the cost of producing them is mostly sunk), “spillovers” (easy for others to appropriate), and “synergies” (can be combined effectively).

With these properties, firms can achieve much larger scale, go to great lengths to prevent spillovers to competitors who can appropriate their sunk investments, and acquire other firms with intangible assets that offer synergies (like human capital or branding). Haskel and Westlake argue that these properties help explain the rise of superstar firms, more mergers and acquisitions, and higher market concentration in industries with a larger share of intangible investment.

In industries with greater intangible investment, small firms may have a harder time finding financing to invest and boost productivity. Small firms typically rely on bank lending that often require collateral from borrowers. But intangibles cannot offer physical collateral, are hard to measure, and, in the case of investments in knowledge and research and development, can easily be appropriated by others. These characteristics of intangibles make private equity financing more attractive for intangible-heavy firms, not only to undertake investments in assets where the cost is mostly sunk, but also to have an easier time protecting intellectual property when privately held.

In addition, private equity financing and venture capital for small firms can be difficult to scale up. These difficulties are partly due to the importance of social relationships and the large role of public subsidies in supporting a vibrant venture capital industry, which takes a long time to develop.

Large firms, on the other hand, can use their economies of scale (and buying power to acquire firms) to capture spillovers and exploit synergies. They also more easily attract capital.

LOOKING AHEAD

Are we headed into an economy dominated by big firms? Even techno-optimists, who believe that it is only a matter of time before the potential for today’s technological advances drive faster growth, are pessimistic on the implications for distribution. Concentrated markets may become the new normal. Policies would need to adjust to ensure level playing fields. In addition, better intellectual property protections, broad and inclusive financing ecosystems, new measurement standards, and greater investment in skills are examples of policies better suited for an intangible economy that is dynamic and inclusive. The possibilities are limitless, but the promise won’t realize itself.

source: www.brookings.edu