0 comments on “Simplilearn to Train College Recruits on Digital Economy Skills (India)”

Simplilearn to Train College Recruits on Digital Economy Skills (India)

Mission-critical skills such as big data, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cloud computing, and digital marketing are ones that enterprises are increasingly turning to fresh graduates to fill

Campus and entry level recruiting is a critical component of every corporate HR strategy but often involves many months of onboarding and mentoring to get these employees productive. Simplilearn offers a New-Hire Training Initiative that significantly shortens this time-to-productivity via a structured training curriculum for campus recruits that they can complete before their first day on the job, or within their first couple of weeks.

Simplilearn focuses exclusively on digital-economy skills such as big data, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cloud computing, and digital marketing. These mission-critical skills are also ones that enterprises are increasingly turning to fresh graduates to fill.

Simplilearn’s new program enables organizations to help their recent on-campus recruits become job-ready (and even certified) with necessary technology skills, gained through Simplilearn’s online training courses prior to onboarding of the new employee.

“Campus hiring has never been more critical. With today’s rapid technology changes, it has become essential to ensure young professionals are up-to-date with the digital skills they will need to have an immediate impact at their new companies,” said Krishna Kumar, Founder and CEO of Simplilearn.

“Offering our vast experience in the latest technologies, Simplilearn is well-suited and proud to help Fortune 500 companies and other organizations bridge the gaps in skills and productivity that often come when onboarding new employees fresh from academia,” he added.

During their final semester in their college or university degree programs, recruits will undertake this training, following predefined learning paths that match their upcoming job roles. In addition to online videos and instructor-led lessons, the courses also include practical applied projects and assessments that are relevant in the high-demand fields such as data analysts, programmers, developers,

Simplilearn has partnered with leading IT/ITes, consulting, internet retail companies and Global System Integrators to support their new hire training initiatives. Also, as part of the company’s core offerings, the Simplilearn Digital Transformation Academy covers all aspects of people, process and technology to help organizations achieve competencies in digital technologies and applications.

The Digital Transformation Academy is designed to be customizable across a wide variety of industries and for all employee and management levels and roles while delivering on Simplilearn’ s outcome-centric, high engagement learning approach.

source: www.dqindia.com

0 comments on “Digital Economy is the Key to Realizing Indonesia into the Big Five of the World Economy”

Digital Economy is the Key to Realizing Indonesia into the Big Five of the World Economy

IndonesiaIn an oration entitled “Leap Frog Indonesia Through Digital Economy”, Rudiantara revealed that the development of a digital economic ecosystem is the key to realizing the nation’s economy towards the ranks of the world’s top five economies.

“The experience of a number of startup companies or startups that have grown up like Gojek, Tokopedia, Bukalapak and Traveloka shows that information and communication technology is the main booster rocket that can make a leap frog from zero, passing many stages at once, “To reach a point farther than what other conventional companies can achieve,” said Rudiantara.

To overcome the widening welfare gap in the world today, Rudiantara also urged the world to carry out a global movement. This has been conveyed by Rudiantara at the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) forum in Korea.

One way is through the adoption of innovative digital economic business models and strategies to enable shared economy, digitalization of labor, and financial inclusion. This proposal departs from the experiences of a number of Indonesian startups which prove that digitalization can be directed towards empowering the workforce through new ways.

Rudiantara also mentioned that the digital economy in Indonesia in 2020 is expected to reach 130 billion US dollars or Rp 1,831 trillion. With these achievements, the next two years the digital economy will contribute around 11% of Indonesia’s gross domestic product.

“But of course it’s not as easy as turning your palm to achieve all of that. There are at least seven main issues in the digital economy that must be a common concern. These seven issues are human capital, startup funding, taxation, cyber security, ICT infrastructure, consumer protection, and logistics, “said Rudiantara.

According to Rudiantara, what the government has to do to meet the big changes in the economy and business is to cut regulations a lot and create an ecosystem that provides broad opportunities for innovation to develop.

Rudiantara added, leadership in the digital era must be pursued with at least three principles, namely less of a regulator, by simplifying regulations, simplifying and eliminating permits; more of a facilitator, by providing affirmative policies in developing infrastructure, encouraging digital entrepreneurship, and growing digital economic talents; and more of an accelerator, by accelerating the growth of new digital startups and other business sectors, especially MSMEs.

“The government and the education world must work hand in hand to grow and assist young people to have a passion for technology and become a workforce that has digital skills that are able to view community problems as a challenge to be solved and monetized,” said Rudiantara.

Some time ago, Gojek Indonesia launched Go-Viet in Hanoi, Vietnam. According to Rudiantara, this showed the ability of the nation’s younger generation to solve the problems of modern humanity.

“In the range of the digital economy that is still very young, our nation’s younger people have been able to carve out legacy that is not only sweet to remember, but also surely will inspire the achievements of other nationals in the digital realm of the world,” said Rudiantara.

According to him, this phenomenon also proved that digital space in Indonesia has the same opportunities as other countries in the world. In an increasingly digital world, the perspective of the market must be broader.

Meanwhile, to help prepare Indonesia’s human resources in supporting digital transformation and improving the digital economy, in the near future the Ministry of Communication and Information will launch “Digital Talent Scholarship”. This program is in the form of intensive training scholarships by holding five universities in Indonesia, including Unpad.

source: www.unpad.ac.id

0 comments on “Vodafone claims UK’s first live holographic 5G call”

Vodafone claims UK’s first live holographic 5G call

vodafone efVodafone showed off its 5G prowess on Thursday by conducting what it claims is the U.K.’s first ever live holographic call using 5G technology.

The call was carried out between the telco’s Manchester office and Newbury headquarters, and featured England women’s football captain Steph Houghton appearing on stage in hologram form to give football tips to a young fan.

It would be easy to dismiss the demonstration as a gimmick, but Vodafone insisted that it points to exciting possibilities that next-generation mobile technology can bring to sport, such as remote coaching and training, as well as opportunities for richer interaction with fans.

“Vodafone has a history of firsts in UK telecoms – we made the nation’s first mobile call, sent the first text and now we’ve conducted the U.K.’s first holographic call using 5G,” said Vodafone UK CEO Nick Jeffery, in a statement.

Of course, holographic 5G calling is only possible when there is a network in place, and with that in mind, Vodafone shared plans to roll out infrastructure in Cornwall and the Lake District next year, and to have 1,000 5G sites up and running nationwide by 2020.

In addition to showcasing 5G, Vodafone also launched new initiatives and tariffs targeted at small businesses and entrepreneurs.

These include a new digital incubator in Manchester; a £300,000 Techstarter award for innovative technology with a social purpose; and a mentorship programme in partnership with Oxford University Innovation called Bright Sparks.

Meanwhile, Vodafone UK’s retail and contact centre staff will be given the opportunity to learn coding via the operator’s new Code Ready scheme. The company is also launching the Vodafone Digital Degree, which combines a computer science degree from the University of Birmingham with a tech apprenticeship at Vodafone.

For small business customers, Vodafone on Thursday launched what it calls a self-optimising tariff that automatically moves subscribers to the most cost-effective plan. It also unveiled Gigacube, a mobile WiFi hotspot that supports up to 20 connections. Vodafone is pitching it to pop-up businesses like shops and restaurants, and companies setting up temporary satellite offices.

“The initiatives we’ve launched today are designed to ensure that everyone can benefit from the digital technologies transforming how we live and work. From our customers and employees, to university students, digital entrepreneurs and businesses, we want to help people across the UK get ready for a digital future,” Jeffery said.

source: www.totaltele.com

0 comments on “Overcoming digital divide – analysis (India)”

Overcoming digital divide – analysis (India)

India FlagIndia’s policies towards digital regulation are inadequate. Future policy-making must be based on economic considerations and evidence, not on myopic political considerations

In 2014, the Narendra Modi-led Government came to power with an objective of ‘minimum Government, maximum governance, aimed at showcasing the country as an investment-friendly destination. Thereafter, on various occasions, the Government announced measures to boost private sector investment in the country. To its credit, several high-level policy decisions, like the Goods and Services Tax (GST) and Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code were enacted to improve the business and investment environment. However, the major test for the Modi-led Government is yet to come.

India is on the cusp of laying the foundation stone for the next digital revolution (Industry 4.0). Industry 4.0, synonymous with the digital economy, is expected to contribute one trillion dollar to national output by 2022-23. Given the undeniable potential of the digital economy to contribute outsize growth, it is incumbent on the Government to adopt a delicate, evidence-based approach to put in place an appropriate regulatory architecture that ensures the country reaps full dividends from Industry 4.0.

However, emergent policy recommendations in the past few weeks indicate that the Government is handling the nascent digital economy with a 20th century mindset. These include recommendations of the Committee of Experts, led by Justice (retd) BN Srikrishna, the draft e-commerce ‘policy’ and the draft report of the Working Group on Cloud Computing — the latter two, as reported by the media, amply illustrate the perils of a dated mindset.

For starters, the decision-making process of all the three have remained opaque and had negligible representation from private organisation, let alone investors. Therefore, the final outcome of these groups has been skewed towards one direction, while ignoring the consideration of other stakeholders, in particular investors. For instance, despite highlighting the economic cost and concomitant adverse impact on the start-up ecosystem associated with data localisation in a white paper, the final recommendation of the BN Srikrishna committee endorses the same. Similar provisions for localisation have found their way in Cloud computing recommendations as well as the draft e-commerce policy. It is important to note that storage of data in India would not mean access to that data by local entities. Additionally, such measures can exacerbate cyber-security risks by compelling enterprises to invest in increasing data storage capacity, while apportioning fewer resources to ensure adequate security controls.

Furthermore, voices for protectionism, which are reminiscent of the discourse during the 1991 reforms, are getting louder. Particularly with respect to the draft e-commerce policy, a document, which besides guiding India’s position at the international trade fora, is aimed at promoting the domestic e-commerce ecosystem. This policy will implicate all aspects of the digital economy, and have a key role to play in India’s preparation for the emergent digital revolution.

However, protectionist voices have argued that the Government should formulate different rules for foreign and domestic companies, citing that availability of abundant capital with foreign companies could kill domestic entrepreneurship.

India has come a long way from considering investments as a bail out to solve external payment crises, to recognising that investments bring with them growth and employment, and consequently make a significant contribution to the economy at large. Constant liberalisation of the foreign investment regime in the country is an example of this approach.

Nonetheless, while dealing with digital economy, a constant international best practice which is cited by protectionist voices is that of China. The question to ask is: Can India afford to adopt the Chinese approach? Currently, India’s share in global value chains (GVC) is estimated to be less than two per cent, while China’s share is in double digits. Importantly, China’s peculiar political and economic outlook makes its policies inimitable. For instance, most Chinese players in the digital economy have been supported by state-led investments.

Unlike China, India neither has the economic footprint to deter other countries from taking restrictive reciprocal measures, nor are our entrepreneurs and businesses supported by public sector finance. On the contrary, foreign capital has played a vital role in providing India’s home-grown digital companies like, Ola and Paytm, a global stage. Introducing onerous regulatory conditions and uncertainty could impact the trust of the investors in India as a promising and stable digital market, consequently damaging the image of the country as an investment-friendly destination.

Therefore, it is important that future policy-making is based on economic considerations and on evidence rather than myopic political considerations. Additionally, the need of the hour is to take a nuanced approach with respect to policies which are expected to impact India’s economic aspirations in the coming decade. Given that the 2019 Lok Sabha election are around the corner, the Modi Government will be under pressure to succumb to various protectionist demands. It should take care to avoid such pitfalls if it is to reap economic dividends in its second-term in power which it projects to win.

source: www.dailypioneer.com

0 comments on “Unlocking the value of data key to UK economic growth”

Unlocking the value of data key to UK economic growth

The Scottish government has identified data-driven innovation as a key area for potential economic growth, and they plan to invest accordingly. Rachel Aldighieri, MD of the DMA, highlights the need for cross-sector collaboration to discover the true worth of data.

Earlier this month, Theresa May signed the Edinburgh and South East Scotland City Region Deal with Nicola Sturgeon. Along with other cultural and economic developments, the deal seeks to invest in the fintech, tech and AI sectors, and will ring-fence money to develop data storage and analysis centres in the Scottish capital.

Key commitments include £300m for world-leading data innovation centres; a £25m regional skills programme to support improved career opportunities for disadvantaged groups; and £65m of new funding for housing to unlock strategic development sites.

Over recent years, the Scottish Government has regularly issued support for the tech, data and marketing industries, identifying the central belt as a key area for growth. The value of the digital economy in Scotland was estimated to be £4.45 billion in 2014. Data-driven innovation alone has the potential to deliver £20 billion of productivity benefits for the economy over the next five years.

The prize is an innovative, growing economy.

Advertising and marketing are at the heart of the UK economy and play a vital role in driving economic growth. Annual UK exports of advertising services are worth £4.1 bn and every £1 spent on advertising returns £6 to the economy, resulting in £120bn to UK GDP.

The Scottish government’s recent investment should provide a platform for the rest of the UK to build on – a pilot project that will highlight the potential of the data and marketing industries to continue to drive the post-Brexit British economy.

Marketers need training in data-related skills

The publicity of the Edinburgh and South East Scotland City Region Deal should help to put the data and marketing industries on the radar of those making career choices in the future.

However, the industry needs to develop stronger ties with academic institutions to increase awareness about the skills required for a role within the data-driven industries and provide insights into the career prospects that these positions can offer. DMA Talent runs a series of Creative Data Academies around the UK to provide practical learning opportunities for young talent interested in a career in the data and marketing industry. Working with Scottish universities, we’ll be developing this programme with a long term aim of reaching schools and colleges throughout the UK.

As both the Scottish and UK governments have realised, businesses will need to upskill in areas concerned with data and its value to business. The recent ‘Professional skills census 2018’ from the Institute of Direct and Digital Marketing (IDM) highlights ‘data-related skills’ as a key area with skills gaps that need to be addressed. In a post-GDPR era, marketers are held more accountable for their actions, but they must receive relevant training and guidance to better understand their evolving roles – where processing consumer data and interpreting it are now key areas of their job description.

Developing an ethical framework for processing data The DMA’s ‘Data privacy: What the consumer really thinks’ report highlights that 88% of consumers believe transparency is key to increasing trust in how their data is collected and used. The research also revealed an important change in attitudes is underway, with more than half (51%) of the respondents viewing data as essential to the smooth running of the modern economy, up sharply from 38% in 2012.

Ultimately, consumers want more control over their personal information but the industry can do more to increase consumer trust, define best practice, and safeguard data usage. The DMA Code provides a series of core guiding principles to our membership for processing consumer data and it encourages best practice within the marketing and data industries.

We are working with our members to give businesses a better understanding of the values of data and shape the responsible route forward. However, an ethical framework for processing data that extends beyond our industry will be key if the UK economy is to thrive on the opportunities presented by technological advances.

The government’s development of the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation will go some way to dealing with the ethical issues raised by rapidly-developing technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI).

The Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation will encourage discussion and research into how data and AI are used in terms of governance and regulation, but more investment will be required for the rest of the UK to follow Scotland’s lead in seeking data-driven innovation.

It is only by putting the customer first and embedding an ethical approach to business culture that consumers and organisations alike will be able to take full advantage of the data revolution. If we don’t get the balance right between data privacy and data-driven innovation, personal data may be misused by some businesses as technology advances. Technology often shapes an organisation’s customer engagement strategy, but our research has shown that trust will influence how receptive and likely consumers are to use it. A practical, universal framework is needed but this will require investment and cross-industry collaboration.

The department of Digital, Culture, Media, and Sport (DCMS) works closely with the DMA on championing innovation and evolution in the data and marketing industries, and the DMA welcomes future discussions around how we can develop and implement such a framework.

To propel the discussion forward, the DMA and DMA Scotland will launch a new initiative entitled Value of data.

This work will seek partnerships with government, businesses and educational institutions to develop a consumer-focused mindset within the data and marketing industries.

Led by Chair Firas Khnaisser (Standard Life) and Vice Chair Derek Lennox (Sainsbury’s Bank), Value of data will help businesses to responsibly deliver value to their customers.

The campaign will provide an engaging, navigable roadmap through a challenging ethical and legal landscape to allow innovative and data-led approaches to customer engagement to thrive. And we’ll do it all with a future-focus: nurturing local and young talent.

Ultimately, the Value of data will develop a true appreciation of the worth of data so businesses can build stronger, more profitable relationships with consumers – responsibly, sustainably and ethically.

The DMA are ready to work alongside our membership, the wider marketing industry, and UK Government to make this a reality in the not too distant future.

source: www.thedrum.com

0 comments on “How cybersecurity and data storage laws could pull the plug on Southeast Asia’s digital economy”

How cybersecurity and data storage laws could pull the plug on Southeast Asia’s digital economy

southeast-asiaJeff Paine says governments in Southeast Asia are keen to capitalise on the opportunity presented by the digital economy, but their rush to regulate data flows and storage will hit start-ups and small local firms hard.

Southeast Asia is one of the most diverse regions in the world, a handful of countries with thousands of languages and cultures, yet all having one thing in common – bold ambitions for their digital economies.

From the establishment of digital agencies like Malaysia Digital Economy Corporation in Malaysia and the Digital Economy and Promotion Agency in Thailand, to charting impressive road maps such as Thailand 4.0 and Making Indonesia 4.0, many governments in the region are prioritising capturing as much of the region’s US$200 billion digital economy opportunity as possible.

What isn’t clear is how these bold aspirations will be achieved.

Despite the inherent benefits of digital technologies and the internet, many governments are pursuing policies that will limit the use of these technologies. Driven by pressure to address specific and immediate challenges including cybersecurity, data protection, privacy and misinformation, governments fail to consider the long-term impact of these laws on economic growth, jobs and investment.

Vietnam’s recent Law on Cybersecurity and Indonesia’s Government Regulation 82 are examples of this, with provisions including restrictions on data flow and content, requirements for foreign companies to set up local offices and local data storage requirements. Meanwhile, proposed rules in Thailand subject over-the-top (OTT) service providers to tax, security and content regulations.

The impact of these regulations goes far beyond the information and communications technology industry, given that virtually every business today uses the internet and digital technology.

For foreign businesses, restrictive, too broad and unclear regulations create uncertainty and an unfriendly investment climate. Multinational companies unable to make long-term financial decisions are likely to shift their investments to countries with more flexible regulatory environments that support the development of a digital ecosystem.

Local businesses, like small and medium-sized enterprises and entrepreneurs that comprise 95 per cent of Southeast Asia’s economy, will bear the brunt of poor policies. Restrictions on cross-border data flows, digital tax and local data storage, will prove difficult to comply with.

Many small businesses depend on digital services and platforms such as cloud for data storage and collaboration, online marketplaces for e-commerce, social media for communication and marketing, and OTT platforms to reach customers at scale. Such laws will increase the cost of doing business, create barriers for expansion beyond borders and are likely to block small players from competing in the global marketplace.

For example, if a neighbouring country enacted similar provisions to Vietnam’s cybersecurity law, a Vietnamese software start-up would be unlikely to be able to afford data storage facilities and local offices in locations outside Vietnam – curbing regional or global expansion plans.

With significant economic prospects at stake, and the challenges of security, privacy, data and misinformation in mind, governments must find better ways to manage risk without hampering growth.

Southeast Asian governments can learn from how larger, developed economies manage emerging technology. For example, Thailand has looked towards the European Union’s implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation as a basis for their data protection laws.

On taxation, intergovernmental organisations such as the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development provide useful guidance in key areas such as the need to create consistency between countries on cross-border digital taxes. Unilateral moves like Australia’s goods and services taxin July 2018 on low-value imported goods is likely to pose compliance challenges and higher costs for small businesses in the long run.

Instead, a cross-sectoral range of agencies, ministries and industry players could together craft comprehensive policies that manage risk and promote growth. A good example of this is Singapore’s approach to digital taxation and preventing misinformation.

The digital economy is uncharted territory for most. There is a small window of opportunity now to ensure smart regulations and policies are in place to secure future growth. Technology companies and industry groups can work with governments, ensuring that the opportunities and benefits of the digital economy are realised and not wasted.

source: www.scmp.com

0 comments on “Irish education system needs ‘profound changes’ to secure digital future”

Irish education system needs ‘profound changes’ to secure digital future

The managing director of Accenture Ireland has warned that Ireland needs to make “profound” changes to its education system to ensure the country is equipped to secure the next wave of jobs in the digital economy.

Alastair Blair, who is also chair of Ibec’s digital economy policy committee, says the advent of artificial intelligence, virtual reality and augmented reality may require a move to a more modular education system to ensure the future workforce has the necessary depth and breadth of skills.

“Traditionally, Ireland has had access to deep skills and the availability of a young and educated workforce,” said Blair, who believes the protection of digital jobs requires a long-term commitment from government, academia and industry working together.

“There is a real opportunity for Ireland to position itself well. However, there is a need for a profound change to our education system to take advantage of the next wave of jobs,” he said.

Blair said Accenture, which acquired Irish creative agency Rothco for a reported €20m this year, is targeting further acquisitions as it is set to mark 50 years in Ireland.

source: www.independent.ie

0 comments on “Nigeria – the Federal Government to achieve growth with digital economy”

Nigeria – the Federal Government to achieve growth with digital economy

NigeriaNigeria.

The Federal Government has announced plans to achieve an all-inclusive economy by prioritising developmental efforts in the digital economy.

Minister of Communication Adebayo Shittu said in Lagos at the weekend that the move by the Federal Government was to ensure that Nigerians had equal access to government services by using digitalisation.

He said plans were on to establish a Nigeria Postal Services (NIPOST) banking, real estate and insurance company to get Nigerians into a financial inclusive economy.

Shittu, who spoke at a stakeholders’ conference on digital addressing system and address verification system, organised by NIPOST, said: ”We are looking at establishing a NIPOST property and development company to make use of NIPOST underutilised facilities wasting away. It is our plan as part of the general reform to ensure that most of the vacant and unused land are leased out to the public to establish property development. Some of the land will be available to build estates, event centres, garages and others to earn revenue for the Federal Government.”

He said in two years, NIPOST would be the leading Federal Government agency in terms of its influence on the life of every Nigerian, adding that courtesy of its upgraded processes, it would help in bringing in the largest amount of money into the Federal Government’s coffers.

”There are communities, which are about 200 to 300 kilometres away from the state capital. With the help of these offices, people can access government services from their communities. By the time we conclude in establishing these companies, there will be no one who will not be affected positively by NIPOST multifaceted companies,” the minister said.

source: http://thenationonlineng.net

0 comments on “What ride-sharing means for Canada’s cities”

What ride-sharing means for Canada’s cities

dfasfHow are ride-sharing and other digital platforms changing our cities? Questions remain about the impact of the sharing economy on our jobs and the economy.

“I’ll just grab a Lyft or Uber,” I casually said when my friend asked how I was planning to get home to Etobicoke from the heart of Toronto. If you aren’t familiar with Toronto, the city spans about 630 square kilometres, and Etobicoke is its westernmost district.

The part of Etobicoke where I’m from is 25 kilometres from downtown. To put this distance into a broader context, 25 kilometres from downtown Vancouver would put you roughly in Delta or Surrey, and in Montreal it would take you halfway to Laval. Needless to say, Toronto is big, and getting around in it can be a challenge — so much so that a recent study named Toronto the worst city in North America for commuting. This isn’t exactly what we want to come first for. One key development — ride-sharing — is taking root and scaling fast, and it is helping Toronto shed this less than favourable reputation.

The rise of the sharing economy

How are the digital economy, the gig economy, ride-sharing and the future of transportation important for Canada, for our collective economic future and for the shaping of our cities? What is the impact of the increasing influence of technology across economic sectors, and what does it mean for Canadians in terms of jobs, skill needs and changes in employment and the economy? These are some of the issues that the Information and Communications Technology Council studies.

One thing that is increasingly reshaping how we understand our economic systems is the changing nature of work. What we refer to as the sharing economy operates mostly by reliance on gig workers who are part-time, freelance or on contract rather than full-time. Such employment is a central component of the sharing economy, which offers opportunities for people to pool underutilized resources, such as properties or vehicles that they own, while generating income and also connecting people in the community.

Recent estimates suggest that the proportion of Canada’s workers who are engaged in part-time, temporary work or self-employment is around 30 percent. Clearly, the sharing economy and gig work — both disrupters of traditional work structures and business models — are here to stay.

Ride-sharing is more than just driving

Looking at ride-sharing, we see new apps and services emerging regularly. Examples include companies like Curb, based in San Jose, which lets users schedule pickups ahead of time, or Wingz, based in San Francisco, which allows users to schedule rides to and from airports at flat fees and even to choose their preferred driver.

A substantial player in the sharing economy, ride-sharing is quickly becoming a staple of transportation. Peer-to-peer platforms that blend technology and community-driven services, ride-sharing apps have recalibrated what it means to commute and travel. With the simple use of a mobile phone, applications like TuroLyftUber and many others provide access to vehicles on demand.

I lived in Los Angeles for a few years, and ride-sharing was a significant lifeline. Offering the ability to hail a car within minutes, platforms like these provide a convenient and cost-effective method of travel — particularly for millennials like me, who increasingly choose not to own a car. Similarly, companies like Amazon, through Amazon Flex, are also using the concept of ride-sharing to bolster their businesses, while providing new avenues for employment. Applications like Turo challenge the vehicle rental market, by allowing users to connect to vehicle owners in their community to essentially “rent” a car. If you consider that the majority of vehicles reportedly are not in use 95 percent of the time, finding a way to make the best of that unused time by sharing them seems logical.

Other digital platforms have also taken off. While some of the more well-known ones are accommodation-rental services like Airbnb, of particular interest is the growth of services that focus on pets. Apps like Rover let users browse available pet-sitters in their area, and DogVacay matches pet owners with sitters in the area who can host the pet at their homes.

The future of transportation for Canadian cities

A few weeks back, I had the pleasure of joining a panel in downtown Toronto, moderated by TV/radio host and author Amber Mac, where I chatted with Turo’s Cedric Mathieu and Lyft’s Aaron Zifkin about ride-sharing and what it means for Toronto. Icons of peer-to-peer vehicle sharing, both companies had recently followed Uber’s decision in 2012 and chosen Canada as their first location for expansion outside the US. While Lyft is still fairly new to the Canadian market, this spring marked Turo’s two-year anniversary in the city.

What are the results so far when it comes to ride-sharing in Canada? Uber is currently available in 17 cities across the country. During its two years in Canada, Turo managed to draw 350,000 users to its platform, which lists more than 10,000 vehicles. Similarly, even before its debut, Toronto was already gearing up to go for a ride with Lyft. The app received more than 50,000 downloads in Toronto prior to official launch. Whether you’re hailing a car to get from one end of the city to another, or renting one to drive to Mont-Tremblant for the weekend, sharing applications like Uber, Lyft and Turo service a need for convenient, fast and affordable transit alternatives.

In the end, the 25-kilometre ride from the panel in downtown Toronto to Etobicoke cost me $20 on a Lyft Line — a car-pooling option similar to UberPOOL. On that journey I met two other passengers who were going my way and chose to car-pool. For $20, I was able to get to my destination quickly and conveniently, make a connection in the community and possibly eliminate the need for one or two more cars on the road. Similarly, the next time I need to take a trip outside of the city, I will most likely forgo a trip to Hertz and grab a Turo instead.

Ride-sharing, connected cities and the future of work

The benefits of the sharing economy — increased connectivity, the efficient use of assets or skills and greater economic participation — are playing an important role in our cities and communities. Ride-sharing apps like Lyft and Uber fill a need for accessible and convenient transportation. Services like Airbnb, Homestay and Couchsurfing provide access to accommodation that might offer better prices and more flexibility than traditional hotels, and freelancing platforms like UpWork and Toptal allow skilled workers to access more employment opportunities.

These kinds of services are transforming the places we live, and also how we interact with them and within them. Increasingly, they are inspiring questions about how basic needs like housing, employment and transportation should be met. Uber currently has over 40 million active users per month, and Airbnb cites more than 150 million global users on its platform. Challenging the traditional modes of transportation like taxis, or traditional accommodation like hotels, these services offer a greater availability of options, convenience and experiences for consumers, and could reshape our cities.

However, even these new developments, which are propelled by consumer demand and are shifting business and economic models, often require some finesse to operate within our current economic and social platforms. Last month, the city of Barcelona instructed Airbnb to remove more than 2,500 listings that were operating without city-approved licences. The crackdown on Airbnb was a direct result of the increase in popularity of Barcelona as a tourist attraction, which had led to a surge of Airbnb listings, limiting the ability of residents to find affordable housing.

The city of Amsterdam took a different approach, in its effort to battle excessive rents and low vacancy rates. It introduced a regulation allowing owners to rent out their places on Airbnb for a maximum of 60 days per year. Owners who surpass this limit have to apply for a hotel licence.

The idea behind both approaches is to allow these alternative services to continue, while ensuring that communities are not negatively impacted by them.

The sharing economy and regulation

During the Q & A portion of the Toronto panel, an audience member raised a question about the role of inclusivity in the sharing economy: While the sharing economy has immense potential to integrate new players economically, what can we do to ensure that this new marketplace doesn’t become an elite platform of income generation for those who already own assets like housing or vehicles? How can populations such as remote communities, people with disabilities and Indigenous communities benefit from the sharing economy? These are important questions that need to be kept at the forefront of the discussion and will play a key role in regulation.

While in some ways, sharing economy platforms like Uber or Lyft have been seen to offer expanded mobility and employment opportunities for people with disabilities, for example, issues including unfair pay and lack of work benefitshave recently arisen. In May, the Supreme Court of California tackled this issue. Its ruling significantly limited the ability of businesses to classify workers as independent contractors who therefore do not receive key employment benefits. While the debate about how the sharing economy should be regulated and who should regulate it continues, decisions like these will guide the public bodies that are willing to engage in the debate.

Most of the regulation we have seen to date around the sharing economy has taken place at the city level. Some early adopters of the sharing economy like Portland, Oregon, Washington, DC, and Chicago have established tax-collecting arrangements with sharing companies. This means that these sharing services will be subject to taxes, just like traditional businesses. Similarly, in 2016, five Florida-based cities formed a public-private partnership with Uber to subsidize rides. All Uber rides in these cities were subsidized to the tune of 20 percent, and those taking public transit were subsidized by 25 percent. This initiative was undertaken in order to alleviate traffic problems and to find savings on transportation and road building.

However, not all regulators have been as positive toward the sharing economy as those in Florida. For example, in late 2017, Uber shut down operations in Denmark, following the development of new taxi laws that required Uber vehicles to be fitted with fare meters and seat sensors. Companies like Uber continue to face challenges in many European cities, following the decision by the European Court of Justice classifying these services as transport companies. This ruling means that ride-sharing services are subject to stricter regulation and licensing in the EU.

The sharing economy vs. traditional industries

Innovations like ride-sharing can reshape the way we think of driving and commuting. They could even contribute to turning the most challenging commute in North America into one of the best. But ultimately, the success of these and other applications in the sharing economy is rooted in their ability to contribute to economic growth and their ability to provide advantages for everyone, including Canada’s most vulnerable populations. It’s our job to ensure that the new doors that the sharing economy opens are open to all, and that the future economy is one that everyone has the opportunity to participate in.

How will these trends in transportation affect consumer markets and labour productivity, and what impact they will have on the economy in general? In the interests of creating an inclusive, sustainable and innovative future for Canada, we need to evaluate questions like these.

In Ontario, over the past few years, the government has tailored insurance schemes to be relevant to ride-sharing companies. The Financial Services Commission of Ontario has approved auto insurance products for eight ride-sharing companies and three car-sharing companies. They work by activating the company’s insurance while the app is in use, and then switching to the owner’s private insurance once the app is turned off. Responding to changes and disruptions created by these new platforms, the Ontario government recently created the Sharing Economy Framework with the intent of generating new wealth for the province, while assessing challenges and issues along the way. The framework seeks to conduct research and consult with stakeholders on the sharing economy, identify opportunities or gaps, develop methods to address those gaps and gather data on actions taken to assess outcomes and results.

The approach to regulating the sharing economy is not standard across the country. In 2016, the British Columbia Chamber of Commerce called for policies on the sharing economy. This call focused on assessing proper taxes on short-term rentals like Airbnb, as well as the establishment of relevant regulations, the removal of unnecessary red tape and the integration of ride-sharing into the broader provincial Passenger Transportation Act. However, progress has been slow to date, and BC has become all but infamous for the delay in allowing these services to enter the province. Most recently, stating the need to develop BC-specific policies and insurance mechanisms to support ride-sharing, the government announced that ride-sharing would continue to remain unavailable in the province until the fall of 2019. Instead, the province has committed to adding more taxis to the road in the interest of mitigating supply shortages.

What is the best way forward for Canada in the sharing economy? Should legislation and policy development be considered on a case-by-case basis at the municipal level, as in the Florida cities that forged a partnership with Uber for reduced fares? Should it be at the provincial level, encouraging the development of policy frameworks for each province, like Ontario’s Sharing Economy Framework? Or should it take place at the federal level, offering a clear standard or guidelines for all provinces and municipalities to implement, similar to the ruling by the European Court of Justice that Uber is a transportation service?

The answers to these questions are neither easy or straightforward. They require substantial research and data collection on considerations relevant to each type of sharing platform, as well as extensive consultation with stakeholders, policy-makers and consumers. While the policy needs of British Columbia may differ in some ways from those of Ontario when it comes to this newly developing economical structure, one thing is clear: the sharing economy is not only here, but it is likely here to stay. The challenge now is to assess the appropriate balance between safety, consumer protection and economic needs, while at the same time continuing to support and drive Canada’s growth in the innovation economy.

source: http://policyoptions.irpp.org

0 comments on “Want to succeed in the digital economy? Bridge the cloud skills gap”

Want to succeed in the digital economy? Bridge the cloud skills gap

Screenshot_1.pngCloud is now a business imperative, and we see many organizations taking a cloud-first approach to innovate faster and serve customers better. Increased agility, more cost savings and better competitive advantages are also amongst the most cited reasons for an organization’s transition to the cloud. However, there’s one area of concern the industry hasn’t been able to effectively address so far – bridging the cloud skills gap.

In Oracle’s Your Platform research, respondents from India cited lack of skills as one of the top three challenges they face when migrating to the cloud. Skills issues were also called out as issues around having the right capabilities for developing applications in the cloud, and around data management. The ability to find and retain cloud-savvy IT staff continues to be considered one of the key barriers to cloud adoption. No wonder, moving to the cloud is still deemed to be risky by some CIOs, but should it be?

The reality is that the bigger risk is not moving to the cloud, which is rapidly proving itself as easier to manage, maintain and secure than traditional IT environments. In particular, cloud services are vastly more secure that many on-premises alternatives, due to the fact that more time and money are spent on them by major cloud providers, and they’re continually kept patched and up-to-date as a result.

What we see from talking to CIOs across industries is that where skills gaps issues exist, they relate less to having specific cloud skills and centre more on mindset. So what are the gaps and how can companies seek to overcome them?

Think big – Infrastructure cloud services enable businesses to operate elastically, at a vastly increased scale. This gives the company an amazing opportunity to change the dynamics of how they operate. Instead of just migrating individual databases, think bigger, consolidating the various data sets you have around the business into a unified dataset. There are multiple benefits of this. At a base level, you can have more applications per server and manage them all as one, and with AI and machine learning becoming more prevalent, you can be prepared to take maximum use of these exciting emerging technologies by preparing for it now by creating a single data asset.

Data orchestration – Businesses are increasingly seeking to become data-driven. IT teams need to stop looking at data as by-product of processes and instead regard it as profit opportunity. This means thinking about how business information can be turned into actionable insights that lead to customer engagement and profitable growth.

Advanced data management – Data is the new oil for businesses: a huge source of potential wealth if mined, refined and distributed well. A core skill for enterprise IT teams is, therefore, how to store, manage and transport data. T

Hiring for the cloud era
Creating a team for the future will inevitably affect the hiring process. Rather than look for new employees from traditional, external sources, most likely direct competitors, CIOs should aim to recruit from cloud-native companies. These staff are used to handling data in the cloud and have the required cloud skills.

Internal talent
Don’t forget you already might have internal talent that has the potential to shine in a cloud world. Holding or attending ‘hackathons’ or offering existing staff the opportunity to volunteer to take part in new cloud projects could give you the chance to spot skills you didn’t know the team possessed.

Protecting HR investments
Once an enterprise has upskilled its team, talent retention is important. This is to ensure that the business feels a positive benefit from its investment and that real change is given the time needed to take root.

Your competitive advantage
If enterprise IT teams can close the cloud skills gap, the rewards will be well worth the effort. The renewed, high-performing team will quickly demonstrate value to the C-suite and other key corporate stakeholders, while enabling a core competitive differentiator for the business.