Category Archives: education

Simplilearn to Train College Recruits on Digital Economy Skills (India)

Mission-critical skills such as big data, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cloud computing, and digital marketing are ones that enterprises are increasingly turning to fresh graduates to fill

Campus and entry level recruiting is a critical component of every corporate HR strategy but often involves many months of onboarding and mentoring to get these employees productive. Simplilearn offers a New-Hire Training Initiative that significantly shortens this time-to-productivity via a structured training curriculum for campus recruits that they can complete before their first day on the job, or within their first couple of weeks.

Simplilearn focuses exclusively on digital-economy skills such as big data, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cloud computing, and digital marketing. These mission-critical skills are also ones that enterprises are increasingly turning to fresh graduates to fill.

Simplilearn’s new program enables organizations to help their recent on-campus recruits become job-ready (and even certified) with necessary technology skills, gained through Simplilearn’s online training courses prior to onboarding of the new employee.

“Campus hiring has never been more critical. With today’s rapid technology changes, it has become essential to ensure young professionals are up-to-date with the digital skills they will need to have an immediate impact at their new companies,” said Krishna Kumar, Founder and CEO of Simplilearn.

“Offering our vast experience in the latest technologies, Simplilearn is well-suited and proud to help Fortune 500 companies and other organizations bridge the gaps in skills and productivity that often come when onboarding new employees fresh from academia,” he added.

During their final semester in their college or university degree programs, recruits will undertake this training, following predefined learning paths that match their upcoming job roles. In addition to online videos and instructor-led lessons, the courses also include practical applied projects and assessments that are relevant in the high-demand fields such as data analysts, programmers, developers,

Simplilearn has partnered with leading IT/ITes, consulting, internet retail companies and Global System Integrators to support their new hire training initiatives. Also, as part of the company’s core offerings, the Simplilearn Digital Transformation Academy covers all aspects of people, process and technology to help organizations achieve competencies in digital technologies and applications.

The Digital Transformation Academy is designed to be customizable across a wide variety of industries and for all employee and management levels and roles while delivering on Simplilearn’ s outcome-centric, high engagement learning approach.

source: www.dqindia.com

Vodafone claims UK’s first live holographic 5G call

vodafone efVodafone showed off its 5G prowess on Thursday by conducting what it claims is the U.K.’s first ever live holographic call using 5G technology.

The call was carried out between the telco’s Manchester office and Newbury headquarters, and featured England women’s football captain Steph Houghton appearing on stage in hologram form to give football tips to a young fan.

It would be easy to dismiss the demonstration as a gimmick, but Vodafone insisted that it points to exciting possibilities that next-generation mobile technology can bring to sport, such as remote coaching and training, as well as opportunities for richer interaction with fans.

“Vodafone has a history of firsts in UK telecoms – we made the nation’s first mobile call, sent the first text and now we’ve conducted the U.K.’s first holographic call using 5G,” said Vodafone UK CEO Nick Jeffery, in a statement.

Of course, holographic 5G calling is only possible when there is a network in place, and with that in mind, Vodafone shared plans to roll out infrastructure in Cornwall and the Lake District next year, and to have 1,000 5G sites up and running nationwide by 2020.

In addition to showcasing 5G, Vodafone also launched new initiatives and tariffs targeted at small businesses and entrepreneurs.

These include a new digital incubator in Manchester; a £300,000 Techstarter award for innovative technology with a social purpose; and a mentorship programme in partnership with Oxford University Innovation called Bright Sparks.

Meanwhile, Vodafone UK’s retail and contact centre staff will be given the opportunity to learn coding via the operator’s new Code Ready scheme. The company is also launching the Vodafone Digital Degree, which combines a computer science degree from the University of Birmingham with a tech apprenticeship at Vodafone.

For small business customers, Vodafone on Thursday launched what it calls a self-optimising tariff that automatically moves subscribers to the most cost-effective plan. It also unveiled Gigacube, a mobile WiFi hotspot that supports up to 20 connections. Vodafone is pitching it to pop-up businesses like shops and restaurants, and companies setting up temporary satellite offices.

“The initiatives we’ve launched today are designed to ensure that everyone can benefit from the digital technologies transforming how we live and work. From our customers and employees, to university students, digital entrepreneurs and businesses, we want to help people across the UK get ready for a digital future,” Jeffery said.

source: www.totaltele.com

Unlocking the value of data key to UK economic growth

The Scottish government has identified data-driven innovation as a key area for potential economic growth, and they plan to invest accordingly. Rachel Aldighieri, MD of the DMA, highlights the need for cross-sector collaboration to discover the true worth of data.

Earlier this month, Theresa May signed the Edinburgh and South East Scotland City Region Deal with Nicola Sturgeon. Along with other cultural and economic developments, the deal seeks to invest in the fintech, tech and AI sectors, and will ring-fence money to develop data storage and analysis centres in the Scottish capital.

Key commitments include £300m for world-leading data innovation centres; a £25m regional skills programme to support improved career opportunities for disadvantaged groups; and £65m of new funding for housing to unlock strategic development sites.

Over recent years, the Scottish Government has regularly issued support for the tech, data and marketing industries, identifying the central belt as a key area for growth. The value of the digital economy in Scotland was estimated to be £4.45 billion in 2014. Data-driven innovation alone has the potential to deliver £20 billion of productivity benefits for the economy over the next five years.

The prize is an innovative, growing economy.

Advertising and marketing are at the heart of the UK economy and play a vital role in driving economic growth. Annual UK exports of advertising services are worth £4.1 bn and every £1 spent on advertising returns £6 to the economy, resulting in £120bn to UK GDP.

The Scottish government’s recent investment should provide a platform for the rest of the UK to build on – a pilot project that will highlight the potential of the data and marketing industries to continue to drive the post-Brexit British economy.

Marketers need training in data-related skills

The publicity of the Edinburgh and South East Scotland City Region Deal should help to put the data and marketing industries on the radar of those making career choices in the future.

However, the industry needs to develop stronger ties with academic institutions to increase awareness about the skills required for a role within the data-driven industries and provide insights into the career prospects that these positions can offer. DMA Talent runs a series of Creative Data Academies around the UK to provide practical learning opportunities for young talent interested in a career in the data and marketing industry. Working with Scottish universities, we’ll be developing this programme with a long term aim of reaching schools and colleges throughout the UK.

As both the Scottish and UK governments have realised, businesses will need to upskill in areas concerned with data and its value to business. The recent ‘Professional skills census 2018’ from the Institute of Direct and Digital Marketing (IDM) highlights ‘data-related skills’ as a key area with skills gaps that need to be addressed. In a post-GDPR era, marketers are held more accountable for their actions, but they must receive relevant training and guidance to better understand their evolving roles – where processing consumer data and interpreting it are now key areas of their job description.

Developing an ethical framework for processing data The DMA’s ‘Data privacy: What the consumer really thinks’ report highlights that 88% of consumers believe transparency is key to increasing trust in how their data is collected and used. The research also revealed an important change in attitudes is underway, with more than half (51%) of the respondents viewing data as essential to the smooth running of the modern economy, up sharply from 38% in 2012.

Ultimately, consumers want more control over their personal information but the industry can do more to increase consumer trust, define best practice, and safeguard data usage. The DMA Code provides a series of core guiding principles to our membership for processing consumer data and it encourages best practice within the marketing and data industries.

We are working with our members to give businesses a better understanding of the values of data and shape the responsible route forward. However, an ethical framework for processing data that extends beyond our industry will be key if the UK economy is to thrive on the opportunities presented by technological advances.

The government’s development of the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation will go some way to dealing with the ethical issues raised by rapidly-developing technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI).

The Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation will encourage discussion and research into how data and AI are used in terms of governance and regulation, but more investment will be required for the rest of the UK to follow Scotland’s lead in seeking data-driven innovation.

It is only by putting the customer first and embedding an ethical approach to business culture that consumers and organisations alike will be able to take full advantage of the data revolution. If we don’t get the balance right between data privacy and data-driven innovation, personal data may be misused by some businesses as technology advances. Technology often shapes an organisation’s customer engagement strategy, but our research has shown that trust will influence how receptive and likely consumers are to use it. A practical, universal framework is needed but this will require investment and cross-industry collaboration.

The department of Digital, Culture, Media, and Sport (DCMS) works closely with the DMA on championing innovation and evolution in the data and marketing industries, and the DMA welcomes future discussions around how we can develop and implement such a framework.

To propel the discussion forward, the DMA and DMA Scotland will launch a new initiative entitled Value of data.

This work will seek partnerships with government, businesses and educational institutions to develop a consumer-focused mindset within the data and marketing industries.

Led by Chair Firas Khnaisser (Standard Life) and Vice Chair Derek Lennox (Sainsbury’s Bank), Value of data will help businesses to responsibly deliver value to their customers.

The campaign will provide an engaging, navigable roadmap through a challenging ethical and legal landscape to allow innovative and data-led approaches to customer engagement to thrive. And we’ll do it all with a future-focus: nurturing local and young talent.

Ultimately, the Value of data will develop a true appreciation of the worth of data so businesses can build stronger, more profitable relationships with consumers – responsibly, sustainably and ethically.

The DMA are ready to work alongside our membership, the wider marketing industry, and UK Government to make this a reality in the not too distant future.

source: www.thedrum.com

Surviving in a digital economy: A study of the consultant brokerage industry

The master thesis is written by Andreas Pettersson and concludes the author’s studies
in Industrial and Management Engineering with a focus on innovation and strategic
business development, Luleå University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Business Administration and Industrial Engineering.

Purpose – The purpose of this master thesis is to identify critical factors and create guidelines for traditional consultant brokerage firms to stay competitive in a digital economy.

Methodology – This qualitative study with an abductive approach, gathered data primary from semi-structured interviews. A total 18 interviews were conducted with travel agency executives as well as buyers, sellers, and matchmakers of consultant services. Collected data were analyzed using thematic coding.

Findings – The main findings of this show that traditional matchmakers can take actions to stay competitive if a digital platform enters the market. In addition, the study suggests proactive and reactive measures that organizations can take to address these disruptive forces.

Theoretical implications – The study will provide an understanding of consultant brokerage and their function as a matchmaker in the marketplace. Besides, it will provide an insight into how some traditional matchmakers can survive in a digital economy.

Practical implications – This thesis will provide managers with concrete guidelines on how to react in the event of disintermediation of a matchmaker market.

Keywords – Disintermediation, Business strategy, Reintermediation, Matchmakers, Intermediates, Consultants, Brokers

Paper type – Master thesis

More/source:http://ltu.diva-portal.org

Irish education system needs ‘profound changes’ to secure digital future

The managing director of Accenture Ireland has warned that Ireland needs to make “profound” changes to its education system to ensure the country is equipped to secure the next wave of jobs in the digital economy.

Alastair Blair, who is also chair of Ibec’s digital economy policy committee, says the advent of artificial intelligence, virtual reality and augmented reality may require a move to a more modular education system to ensure the future workforce has the necessary depth and breadth of skills.

“Traditionally, Ireland has had access to deep skills and the availability of a young and educated workforce,” said Blair, who believes the protection of digital jobs requires a long-term commitment from government, academia and industry working together.

“There is a real opportunity for Ireland to position itself well. However, there is a need for a profound change to our education system to take advantage of the next wave of jobs,” he said.

Blair said Accenture, which acquired Irish creative agency Rothco for a reported €20m this year, is targeting further acquisitions as it is set to mark 50 years in Ireland.

source: www.independent.ie

An organisation in Iraq is working with young people to help “bring the country to a more digital economy”

Re:Coded was founded in 2016 and holds courses for people wishing to learn more about coding.

Zahra Shah, Program Manager at the organisation said: “We launched as a coding school to try and upscale youth here and bring them more towards a digital economy especially in Iraq where a lot of the jobs are provided by the government.

“The economy is not doing great, a lot of the money that comes from oil and gas, they’re not using it to rebuild the country and a lot of that is due to corruption unfortunately. But our solution is that there are so many youth here interested in technology.

Zahra Shah, Program Manager at Iraq Re:Coded said there is a need for coding teachers in the country (Re:Coded)

“So we started a school to cater to that need for youths to have access to that education. Even the students that learn computer science at university, they’re not learning properly how to become computer programmers, it’s very theoretical. We fill that gap by teaching android app development.”

Students can take part in Re:Coded’s five month boot camps or the tech entrepreneurship academy. It’s come at a good time for the country, with the start up and tech industry growing.

Ms Shah has seen the growth first hand having moved to Iraq last August. She said: “I’ve seen so much change already. There is a huge co-working space that opened in Baghdad four months ago in addition to our co-working space in Erbil. I feel that there’s more NGOs as well getting with the programme when it comes to technology.

“A lot of our graduates are being employed because they have the tech skills to leverage that and move their projects forward so I am definitely seeing a difference. People are starting to see the benefit of relying more on technology and doing stuff online, freelancing and entrepreneurship.”

Iraq’s tech scene is growing rapidly and Re:Coded is hoping to get as many women onto the scene as possible (REUTERS)

“Iraq is still behind the rest of the middle east in comparison to Dubai, but even just on a grass-roots level I feel it’s growing so quick and i’m really surprised to see how much it’s changed just from being here in a year so in another five years, I see it going a lot further.” A main focus by the organisation is the need to get women involved in coding.

“We always aim for at least 40 percent women across our projects, in our boot camps, we have 40-50 percent, the same with everything we offer. A minimum of 40 percent is our goal,” Ms Shah added.

For those who graduate from the boot camp, the job prospects are huge. Some have found employment with some of the organisation’s sponsors while others have decided to start their own startup. While others have chosen to teach coding themselves.

The country’s tech and startup industry is starting to grow (Re:Coded)

“In our last boot camp, we had 35 students, of those students that were looking for full-time employment, around 90 percent of them have gone into employment especially in the local economy.

Digital economy plays key role in high-quality growth (China)

chinaChina’s manufacturing industry is aiming to transform itself from “Quantity” to “Quality”. The key strategy is to develop a digital economy, said Li Yizhong, the former minister from China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology on Sunday.

Speaking at the 2018 World Forum on Scientific and Technological Innovation in Beijing,Li said “A digital economy means a deep integration of Information technology (IT) and the manufacturing industry.”

“It is the trend of a global economy as well as a national strategy for a high-quality growth in manufacturing and internet development,’ he added.

Then, how to develop a digital economy?

Li noted that cutting-edge technologies like big data, internet, cloud computing, and Artificial Intelligence (AI) need to be closely integrated with the manufacturing industry to develop new products and business models.

There are three areas where China’s digital economy has developed the most in recent years, Li summarized, firstly, the IT industry has seen a fast growth and contributed 8 percent to the overall GDP growth last year.

Secondly, enterprises have played bigger roles in developing a digital economy. They have realized the significance of the integration between manufacturing and IT. For instance, Alibaba has rolled out an industrial system that integrated the internet and its companies. The IT industry includes telecom manufacturing, communication services, software and the internet industries.

Thirdly, the benchmarks in digitalization have been improved. For example, indoor broadband penetration has reached 86.7 percent while mobile broadband penetration has risen to 86.3 percent, and the internet surfing fee has been reduced by 46.2 percent, which has exceeded the goals set for 2020.

The number of robots used by every 10,000 workers on average has been increased from 23 in 2013 to 50 as of now, which is close to the world’s averages. The patents held by every 10,000 citizens on average have doubled since 2013. Moreover, enterprises hold over 60 percent of the overall patents.

He also pointed out the challenges faced by digital economy developments.

Core technologies are still controlled by other nations. The Chinese economic structure is still at the low-end. There are significant gaps between China and other developed countries in chips, integrated circuits, software, and data processing techniques. Ninety-five percent of high-end chips are from overseas. Therefore, technological innovations are vital for developing a digital economy.

Most enterprises lack awareness when it comes to digital transformation. They need technical assistance and support. Their understandings of how technologies could enhance productivity require further education. Meanwhile, tech companies lack the knowledge of the industrial demands.

Li suggested strengthening the communication and education for digital transformation among enterprises and leading industrial enterprises by collaborating with internet giants to develop new applications.

On the one hand, interdisciplinary talents who have both knowledgeable of technologies like big data and have the industrial expertise are extremely scarce. On the other hand, loads of traditional workers have been laid off. In France, 3 million jobs will disappear because of digitalization. While in the Guiyang hi-tech industrial development area, 42,000 jobs were created by the digital economy and related industries, Li said.

source: http://en.xfafinance.com