Category Archives: reports

Forbes Releases Digital 100, The Inaugural Ranking Of The Top 100 Public Companies Shaping The Digital Economy

digital 100Forbes’ today released the inaugural  Digital 100 list, a ranking of the top 100 public companies that are shaping the digital economy. The list offers a closer look at the technology, media, digital retail and telecommunication companies that shape the digital world. Not surprisingly, Amazon secures the top spot on the list. Amazon.com is classified as a retail company. And while retail makes up most of the company’s $108.3 billion revenues, its cloud computing division brought in $17.5 billion or 16% of sales last year. Netflix, the leader in internet subscription streaming services, is No. 2. NVIDIA Corporation (No. 3), Salesforce.com (No. 4) and ServiceNow (No. 5), round out the top of the list.

Forbes’ Digital 100 includes companies from all the different corners of the digital economy. IT software & services companies make up 35% of the list. Following close behind are technology hardware and equipment companies with 26 companies and semiconductor companies with 23 companies.

Companies come from 17 different countries with the U.S. and China in the lead. Forty-nine American companies make the list, while China comes in second with 16 companies. Of the top 20 companies on the list, 17 of them are from the U.S. Thirty-four of the companies on the list are from Asia.

The Top 20 Companies on Forbes 2018 Digital 100 list:

Rank Company Name Industry Country
1 Amazon.com Retailing UNITED STATES
2 Netflix Media UNITED STATES
3 NVIDIA Corporation Semiconductors UNITED STATES
4 salesforce.com IT Software & Services UNITED STATES
5 ServiceNow IT Software & Services UNITED STATES
6 Square IT Software & Services UNITED STATES
7 Analog Devices Semiconductors UNITED STATES
8 Palo Alto Networks Technology Hardware & Equipment UNITED STATES
9 Splunk IT Software & Services UNITED STATES
10 Adobe Systems IT Software & Services UNITED STATES
11 Broadcom Inc. Semiconductors UNITED STATES
12 Leidos Holdings Aerospace & Defense UNITED STATES
13 ON Semiconductor Semiconductors UNITED STATES
14 Match Group IT Software & Services UNITED STATES
15 Tech Mahindra IT Software & Services INDIA
16 Workday IT Software & Services UNITED STATES
17 Charter Communications Media UNITED STATES
18 Tencent Holdings IT Software & Services CHINA
19 Micron Technology Semiconductors UNITED STATES
20 SK hynix Semiconductors SOUTH KOREA

For the complete list visit: The 2018 Digital 100

Methodology

To compile the top 100 digital companies, Forbes first looked at the technology, media, digital retail and telecommunication companies that made it onto the 2018 Global 2000, Forbes’ annual ranking of the biggest companies in the world. Then, Forbes added to that group the big digital companies that have gone public since the Global 2000 was published in May. Companies were scored on a variety of factors including sales, profits, assets growth and performance of the stock over the past year. The list was priced on September 7, 2018.

source: www.forbes.com

GSMA: Free Flow of Data across Borders Essential for Asia’s Digital Economies

GSMAGovernments in Asia can expand the region’s digital economy and unlock further socio-economic benefits for their citizens by removing unnecessary restrictions on the movement of data internationally, according to a new report released by the GSMA today at the Mobile 360 – Digital Societies conference in Bangkok. The study, ‘Regional Privacy Frameworks and Cross-Border Data Flows’, reveals that striking the right balance in the region’s data privacy regulations could significantly enhance economic activity and future innovation in 5G, the Internet of Things (IoT) and artificial intelligence (AI).

Over the past decade, international data flows have increased global GDP by 10.1 per cent, and their annual contribution to global GDP has already surpassed US $2.8 trillion1 – a larger share than the global trade in goods. The ability to transfer, store and process data enables commerce, spurs innovation, and drives the development of new technologies, platforms, services and infrastructure.

Although the Asia Pacific region has made good progress in the development of data privacy frameworks that protect consumers while also allowing data to flow across borders, the report highlights that variances in data privacy laws across countries is holding back trade and innovation. The report also calls for better links at a regional level between Asia’s two main privacy frameworks – the ASEAN Framework on Personal Data Protection and the APEC Privacy Framework – to enable cross-border data flows.

“The immense economic opportunities arising from the digital economy and data flows are indisputable,” said Boris Wojtan, Director of Privacy, GSMA. “Working towards a pan-Asian approach to data privacy is critical to protecting the rights of individuals and unlocking this economic potential, not only in Asia, but around the world. Regulating people’s personal information by a patchwork of geographically bound privacy laws will only restrict how Asian companies can innovate and bring better products and services to consumers in the future. Now is an important time for all countries to take actions to bridge the differences in their privacy regulation and achieve greater alignment.”

The study evaluated various regional data privacy frameworks and their key principles, while diving down into individual countries to identify national approaches to privacy regulation. It highlights specific steps that all countries, including less developed states, can take to support greater alignment across Asia. Some of the key recommendations included in the report are:

  • APEC and ASEAN governments should consider the options outlined in the study to bridge the differences between their respective privacy frameworks and seek interoperability with other regional frameworks;
  • Countries should advance the alignment of national-level privacy regimes by conducting a landscape analysis to see where they stand in terms of data privacy and reviewing the experience of other governments in the region to understand common paths forward;
  • Policymakers in government and privacy enforcement authorities should support deeper collaboration and cross-learning across the region; and
  • Governments should also draw on non-government privacy experts in the private sector and academia to inform their approaches.

The GSMA also today released its report, ‘Cross-Border Data Flows: Realising Benefits and Removing Barriers’, which describes the benefits of global data flows for individuals, businesses and governments, and explores the damaging impact of increased data localisation measures, which can either require companies to store data locally, or even prohibit companies from transferring personal data altogether. The report calls for governments globally to commit to removing unnecessary localisation measures and enable data to flow cross-border through improved approaches to protecting people’s data.

The ‘Regional Privacy Frameworks and Cross-Border Data Flows’ report is available here in English.

The ‘Cross-Border Data Flows: Realising Benefits and Removing Barriers’ report is available here in English.

source: https://business.financialpost.com

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Australian Digital Inclusion Index (ADII) 2018

downloadThe Australian Digital Inclusion Index, powered by Roy Morgan Research, measures the extent of digital inclusion in Australia. Access and affordability can present barriers to digital inclusion, however an individual’s digital engagement is also largely affected by Digital Ability (attitudes, skills and activities), whether a person can see potential benefits of engagement, and motivation and attitude, including concerns about safety and security.

This is a digital inclusion measurement tool (Index) that will help inform and promote public policy and program responses to enhance digital inclusion in Australia.

The key objectives of this initiative are:

  • To improve our understanding of digital inclusion and its relationship to social and economic disadvantage in Australia
  • To raise awareness and focus attention on the social impact of digital inclusion
  • To facilitate consultation, debate and discussion among key cross sectoral digital inclusion stakeholders
  • To inform what business, government and community organisations can do to enhance digital confidence and participation for all Australians.

The Australian Digital Inclusion Index  is not tailored to a particular group or section of the community. It measures the level of digital inclusion of the Australian population as a whole and tracks this over time. Any community in Australia can replicate the index to compare their results against Australia as a whole and if they are able, to do this over time.

source: https://digitalinclusionindex.org.au/ 

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$1 Trillion Boost to Asean GDP From Digital Economy

The digital revolution that has become such a powerful force for global change is still in early days in the ASEAN member states. ASEAN’s digital economy represents only 7% of its GDP, compared with 16% in China and 35% in the US, Bain said in a report on Monday. However, the region has much to gain by laying the foundation for the digital economy to power and accelerate intraregional trade and growth (what we term “digital integration”). Digital integration will be critical for ASEAN businesses to compete at home and overseas—it has the power to turn small and midsize enterprises (SMEs) into regional and global players. Digital integration could deliver a $1 trillion rise in GDP in ASEAN by 2025.

Getting there will take a significant effort. While enhancements have been made across ASEAN, broadband coverage needs to improve in rural areas, and advanced digital tools need to become more affordable for SMEs, among other challenges. Also, to help individuals and businesses across the region benefit from digital opportunities, member states will need to accelerate and coordinate their initiatives. The results can be dramatic: ASEAN businesses would have the opportunity to leapfrog those in other major economies.

bain infographic

content nain

source: www.bain.com

Report here

Germany – Digital Economy Monitoring report 2018

germany DEMR 2018

The DIGITAL Economy Index provides a number to show the level of digitalisation in the
German economy. It is based on a survey of high-ranking decision-makers from 1,061
businesses. Three aspects are incorporated in the economy index: the use of digital
devices, the state of internal company digitalisation, and the effect of digitalisation on the company.

Report here and  Library

source: www.zew.de

World Bank report: Malaysia – unlocking the potential of the digital economy

CaptureUnlocking the potential of the digital economy is key to ensuring Malaysia’s successful transition to a high-income economy.

  • Moving forward, Malaysia should consider adopting policies with two main objectives:
    – Improved quality and affordability of fixed broadband services;
    – Increased coverage of ultra-fast broadband networks.
  • To achieve these objectives, the government should strive to increase competition in the fixed broadband market.
    – Better enforcement of the current regulatory framework could provide all operators with access to cable landing stations.
    – Encouraging competition by opening the market across all levels of the telecom and internet supply chain.
  • For Malaysia to increase productivity outcomes in the private sector and drive the country’s digital transformation, it is crucial for the country to improve its level of digital adoption and connectivity.

Report World Bank –  Malaysia Economic Monitor: Navigating Change, part two: Unlocking the potential of the digital economy (2018)

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