Category Archives: telco

Forbes Releases Digital 100, The Inaugural Ranking Of The Top 100 Public Companies Shaping The Digital Economy

digital 100Forbes’ today released the inaugural  Digital 100 list, a ranking of the top 100 public companies that are shaping the digital economy. The list offers a closer look at the technology, media, digital retail and telecommunication companies that shape the digital world. Not surprisingly, Amazon secures the top spot on the list. Amazon.com is classified as a retail company. And while retail makes up most of the company’s $108.3 billion revenues, its cloud computing division brought in $17.5 billion or 16% of sales last year. Netflix, the leader in internet subscription streaming services, is No. 2. NVIDIA Corporation (No. 3), Salesforce.com (No. 4) and ServiceNow (No. 5), round out the top of the list.

Forbes’ Digital 100 includes companies from all the different corners of the digital economy. IT software & services companies make up 35% of the list. Following close behind are technology hardware and equipment companies with 26 companies and semiconductor companies with 23 companies.

Companies come from 17 different countries with the U.S. and China in the lead. Forty-nine American companies make the list, while China comes in second with 16 companies. Of the top 20 companies on the list, 17 of them are from the U.S. Thirty-four of the companies on the list are from Asia.

The Top 20 Companies on Forbes 2018 Digital 100 list:

Rank Company Name Industry Country
1 Amazon.com Retailing UNITED STATES
2 Netflix Media UNITED STATES
3 NVIDIA Corporation Semiconductors UNITED STATES
4 salesforce.com IT Software & Services UNITED STATES
5 ServiceNow IT Software & Services UNITED STATES
6 Square IT Software & Services UNITED STATES
7 Analog Devices Semiconductors UNITED STATES
8 Palo Alto Networks Technology Hardware & Equipment UNITED STATES
9 Splunk IT Software & Services UNITED STATES
10 Adobe Systems IT Software & Services UNITED STATES
11 Broadcom Inc. Semiconductors UNITED STATES
12 Leidos Holdings Aerospace & Defense UNITED STATES
13 ON Semiconductor Semiconductors UNITED STATES
14 Match Group IT Software & Services UNITED STATES
15 Tech Mahindra IT Software & Services INDIA
16 Workday IT Software & Services UNITED STATES
17 Charter Communications Media UNITED STATES
18 Tencent Holdings IT Software & Services CHINA
19 Micron Technology Semiconductors UNITED STATES
20 SK hynix Semiconductors SOUTH KOREA

For the complete list visit: The 2018 Digital 100

Methodology

To compile the top 100 digital companies, Forbes first looked at the technology, media, digital retail and telecommunication companies that made it onto the 2018 Global 2000, Forbes’ annual ranking of the biggest companies in the world. Then, Forbes added to that group the big digital companies that have gone public since the Global 2000 was published in May. Companies were scored on a variety of factors including sales, profits, assets growth and performance of the stock over the past year. The list was priced on September 7, 2018.

source: www.forbes.com

Vodafone claims UK’s first live holographic 5G call

vodafone efVodafone showed off its 5G prowess on Thursday by conducting what it claims is the U.K.’s first ever live holographic call using 5G technology.

The call was carried out between the telco’s Manchester office and Newbury headquarters, and featured England women’s football captain Steph Houghton appearing on stage in hologram form to give football tips to a young fan.

It would be easy to dismiss the demonstration as a gimmick, but Vodafone insisted that it points to exciting possibilities that next-generation mobile technology can bring to sport, such as remote coaching and training, as well as opportunities for richer interaction with fans.

“Vodafone has a history of firsts in UK telecoms – we made the nation’s first mobile call, sent the first text and now we’ve conducted the U.K.’s first holographic call using 5G,” said Vodafone UK CEO Nick Jeffery, in a statement.

Of course, holographic 5G calling is only possible when there is a network in place, and with that in mind, Vodafone shared plans to roll out infrastructure in Cornwall and the Lake District next year, and to have 1,000 5G sites up and running nationwide by 2020.

In addition to showcasing 5G, Vodafone also launched new initiatives and tariffs targeted at small businesses and entrepreneurs.

These include a new digital incubator in Manchester; a £300,000 Techstarter award for innovative technology with a social purpose; and a mentorship programme in partnership with Oxford University Innovation called Bright Sparks.

Meanwhile, Vodafone UK’s retail and contact centre staff will be given the opportunity to learn coding via the operator’s new Code Ready scheme. The company is also launching the Vodafone Digital Degree, which combines a computer science degree from the University of Birmingham with a tech apprenticeship at Vodafone.

For small business customers, Vodafone on Thursday launched what it calls a self-optimising tariff that automatically moves subscribers to the most cost-effective plan. It also unveiled Gigacube, a mobile WiFi hotspot that supports up to 20 connections. Vodafone is pitching it to pop-up businesses like shops and restaurants, and companies setting up temporary satellite offices.

“The initiatives we’ve launched today are designed to ensure that everyone can benefit from the digital technologies transforming how we live and work. From our customers and employees, to university students, digital entrepreneurs and businesses, we want to help people across the UK get ready for a digital future,” Jeffery said.

source: www.totaltele.com

Benin is the latest African nation taxing the internet

taxationBenin has joined a growing list of African states imposing levies for using the internet.

The government passed a decree in late August taxing its citizens for accessing the internet and social-media apps. The directive, first proposed in July, institutes a fee (link in French) of 5 CFA francs ($0.008) per megabyte consumed through services like Facebook, WhatsApp, and Twitter. It also introduces a 5% fee, on top of taxes, on texting and calls, according to advocacy group Internet Sans Frontières (ISF).

The new law has been denounced, with citizens and advocates using the hashtag #Taxepamesmo (“Don’t tax my megabytes”) to call on officials to cancel the levy. The increased fees will not only burden the poorest consumers and widen the digital divide, but they will also be “disastrous” for the nation’s nascent digital economy, says ISF’s executive director Julie Owono. A petition against the levy on Change.org has garnered nearly 7,000 signatures since it was created five days ago.

The West African nation joins an increasing number of African countries that have introduced new fees for accessing digital spaces. Last month, Zambia approved a tax on internet calls in order to protect large telcos at the expense of already squeezed citizens. In July, Uganda also introduced a tax for accessing 60 websites and social-media apps, including WhatsApp and Twitter, from mobile phones. Officials in Kampala also increased excise duty fees on mobile-money transactions from 10% to 15%, in a bid to reduce capital flight and improve the country’s tax-to-GDP ratio.

Digital-rights advocates say these measures are part of wider moves to silence critics and the vibrant socio-political, cultural, and economic conversations taking place online. The adoptions of these taxes, they say, could have a costly impact not just on democracy and social cohesion, but on economic growth, innovation, and net neutrality. Paradigm Initiative, a Nigerian company that works to advance digital rights, has said it was worried Nigeria would follow Uganda’s and Zambia’s footsteps and start levying over-the-top media services like Facebook and Telegram that deliver content on the internet.

But taxing the digital sector might have a negative impact in the long run. Research has already shown that Uganda’s ad hoc fees could cost its economy $750 million in revenue this year alone. “These governments are killing the goose that lays the golden egg,” Owono said.

source: www.qz.com

Telkom SA calls for digital economy summit (South Africa)

-fs-Sipho-Maseko-1-2018.xlTelkom South Africa has called for a multi-sectoral digital economy summit to be convened and attended by operators, the industry regulator, vertical market representatives, tertiary education institutions and other telecommunications industry stakeholders.

In his keynote address to delegates at the 2018 Southern Africa Telecommunication Networks and Applications Conference (SATNAC), Group CEO Telkom SA Sipho Maseko said this would provide a forum to address the question of how to generate economic growth.

The question of how relevant stakeholders will contribute had to be asked and answered.

These questions are not only for operators said Maseko, and it is envisaged that the platform would serve as a forum for all stakeholders to state their position.

Maseko identified several drivers of economy including investment in infrastructure to deliver ubiquitous connectivity, skills and subject matter experts across the spectrum, fair competition and regulation.

In addition to the role of data within an ever-changing market and the influence of the digitised consumer, Maseko also touched upon the issue of regulation.

Telkom SA remains embroiled in a dispute with ICASA (Independent Communications Authority of SA) regarding plans to reduce call termination rates – the price mobile and fixed network operators charge each other for terminating calls between networks.

According to a recent ITWeb report, the company has affirmed that unless the regulator’s draft call termination rates are not amended, it may have to change its business model, stop operations in rural areas and possibly have to cut jobs.

It has reportedly issued a counter-proposal to ICASA and stated that under the regulator’s proposed changes, it would “continue to effectively subsidise the larger mobile network operators.”

Government’s intention and objectives behind the wireless open access network proposed in the draft Electronic Communications Amendment Bill has also attracted widespread attention within the local telecommunications space.

“Regulation and policy can be a big enabler for data growth… but regulation must keep up with the market and tech advances. Regulators sometimes almost exclude themselves from the debate. The question is how do we get the economy to recover?” said Maseko.

He also cautioned that call termination rates and proposals have not recognised the fact that the market has converged, and regulation has to enable investment.

source: www.itwebafrica.com